20th May 2024

“The Lost Mariner” (Year 2 Sun.)

ENGLISH FOR PSYCHOLOGY Forums Neuropsychology “The Lost Mariner” (Year 2 Sun.)

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    • #4318
      admin
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      Discuss Alexander Luria’s quote: “A man does not consist of memory alone. He has feeling, will, sensibility, and moral being” on the example of Jimmie G.

    • #4319
      admin
      Keymaster

      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      Hello everyone! How are you doing?
       22nd March 2020 at 11:02 am #4320 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      KamilaNiszcz
      Participant
      (78.31.151.151)
      Hi, I’ve been better. Im’ going crazy becouse of quarantine.
       22nd March 2020 at 11:05 am #4324 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      Adrian B
      Participant
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      Hello,
      not that bad as it could be. How bout you?
      o 22nd March 2020 at 10:58 am #4316 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      joanna.gutowska
      Participant
      (89.65.130.15)
      Hello! I’m fine, thank you!
      o 22nd March 2020 at 10:59 am #4317 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      KarolinaS
      Participant
      (188.147.101.40)
      Good morning
      In these hard times, still moving forward ?
       22nd March 2020 at 11:00 am #4318 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      It’s good to hear you’re OK. In my neighbourhood a few people are living in quarantine.
       22nd March 2020 at 11:05 am #4325 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      Iza65430
      Participant
      (5.173.178.141)
      A friend of mine just got back from France and she’s also living in quarantine. Have you heard about this new app to follow if you are sitting in home instead of going out?
       22nd March 2020 at 11:09 am #4332 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      I’ve heard about it, but I haven’t downloaded it yet. It may come in useful, though.
      o 22nd March 2020 at 11:01 am #4319 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      Martyna 64134
      Participant
      (37.249.181.126)
      Hello. Im fine, what about you?
       22nd March 2020 at 11:04 am #4322 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      I’m all right, thank you, but I miss the freedom of going out and moving around easily ?
      How did you like the essay I wanted you to read?
       22nd March 2020 at 11:06 am #4326 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      Martyna 64134
      Participant
      (37.249.181.126)
      It was very interesting. Though I liked the one about the women and prioprioception better ?
       22nd March 2020 at 11:10 am #4333 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      I see ? Do you remember what happened to Jimmy? Why did he lose his memory?
       22nd March 2020 at 11:38 am #4357 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      Martyna 64134
      Participant
      (37.249.181.126)
      It seems like he was still perfectly fine in 1965 when he was leaving the navy. Around Christmass of ’70 we firstly experienced delirious excitement and confusion and then the bizarre and deep memory deficits. He didn’t recognise his brother, he thought of himself as well as of his brother as young guys.
      Following reports from the hospital in ’71 stated that he was “totally disoriented … with an advanced organic brain syndrome, due to alcohol”. Doctors were also suspecting a Korsakov’s syndrome as it was the only diagnosable memory loss disorded?? Later on this diagnosis was rejected.
       This reply was modified 8 hours, 14 minutes ago by Martyna 64134.
       This reply was modified 7 hours, 24 minutes ago by admin.
       22nd March 2020 at 12:37 pm #4407 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      Martina, am I right in thinking that you said that he was misdiagnosed with Korsakov’s syndrome?
       22nd March 2020 at 12:56 pm #4421 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      Martyna 64134
      Participant
      (37.249.181.126)
      I was wrong. As I checked now and in the last paragraph it is clearly says that he had both ‘severest, most devastating Korsakov’s’ and ‘a dense amnesia going back to 1945’
       22nd March 2020 at 1:17 pm #4430 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      Yes, he had Korsakov’s (or Korsakoff) syndrome. The unrestricted and prolonged consumption of alcohol may lead to the degeneration of mammillary bodies which causes severe retrograde and anterograde amnesia, confabulation, apathy and at times even hallucinations. Good for Jimmie he didn’t experience them.
       22nd March 2020 at 11:11 am #4335 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      KamilaNiszcz
      Participant
      (78.31.151.151)
      When I started reading it, I fought “ok, amnesia, nothing speciall“, but then it turned out that Jimmy didin’t even know that he had amnesia, he didn’t recognize a doctor with whom he was sitting and talking for a while, and then the doctor gone went out and came back, and Jimmy didn’t recognize him. It was terrifying for me.
       This reply was modified 8 hours, 44 minutes ago by admin.
       22nd March 2020 at 11:18 am #4340 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      Indeed, it is scary. But he remembered many things from the past, he retained his scientific knowledge he acquired in high school, he remembered vividly his childhood, war days and service.
       22nd March 2020 at 11:24 am #4344 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      KamilaNiszcz
      Participant
      (78.31.151.151)
      But he wasn’t able to remember things, people, what he was doing a few minutes ago before. He couldn’t remember the present situation, and I found it the most scary, and I think it was very uncomfortable living like that.
       This reply was modified 8 hours, 15 minutes ago by admin.
       This reply was modified 8 hours, 14 minutes ago by admin.
       22nd March 2020 at 1:54 pm #4439 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      At least he retained his memories up to 1945. Some people with retrograde amensia don’t remember a thing from their lives. Moreover they may suffer dense anterograde amnesia as well.
      o 22nd March 2020 at 11:03 am #4321 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      joanna.gutowska
      Participant
      (89.65.130.15)
      I found this quote very interesting, especially while reading the story of Jimmy G.
      When I read about it I thought there’s nothing new that doctors can come up with (on therms in terms of diagnosis) but the fragment about seeing Jimmy in a chapel really surprised me. It seems like when he was involved in rituals and spirituality he could “get” a piece of his life back, be present in a moment and not forget about it a few minutes ago after.
       This reply was modified 8 hours, 52 minutes ago by admin.
       22nd March 2020 at 11:08 am #4329 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      Joanna, how happend to Jimmy? How come he lost his memory back to 1945?
       22nd March 2020 at 11:16 am #4339 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      joanna.gutowska
      Participant
      (89.65.130.15)
      If I understood the text correctly, the doctors have only few hypotheses about his memory. It might be Korsakov’s syndrome, based on neuron destruction (tiny, mammillary bodies) due to alcohol abuse. As we know from Jimmy’s brother testimony he was “always a drinker”.
      Another hypothesis is that he may have experienced something extremely traumatic around 1945, and repressed his further memories.
       22nd March 2020 at 11:22 am #4342 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      Yes, you’right. but they lean more towards the Korskov’s (or Korsakoff) syndrome for the reasons you’ve mentioned: destruction of neurons in the mamilliary bodies caused by heavy drinking.
      What was life for Jimmie after he lost his memory?
       22nd March 2020 at 11:38 am #4356 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      joanna.gutowska
      Participant
      (89.65.130.15)
      At first glance, he looked like a very energetic, enthusiastic middle-aged man, but when we get to know his story a little deeper he was mostly confused, easily distracted, lost in his own time-loop.
      He was moved from Bellevue Hospital to a nursing home in the Village, passed by these institutions like a hot potato.
      Eventually, he arrived at Home of the Aged near New York City, where our story from the neurologist perspective begins.
       22nd March 2020 at 11:52 am #4373 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
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      Can you compare his situation to Stephen R.’s one? His case was mentioned in Postscript.
       22nd March 2020 at 12:48 pm #4417 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      joanna.gutowska
      Participant
      (89.65.130.15)
      Hm, I think Jimmy and Stephen R. might have something in common. Doctors suspected retrograde amnesia in both cases.
      Retrograde amnesia is caused by damage to the memory-storage areas of the brain, in various brain regions. This type of damage can result from a traumatic injury, a serious illness, a seizure or stroke, or a degenerative brain disease.
      For Jimmy, it was not entirely clear what possibly caused his retrograde amnesia, as I wrote earlier. In Stephen’s case, I guess we can connect it with his severe seizures and spasticity. Stephen lost only few years due to retrograde amnesia, Jimmy, unfortunately, lost much more.
       22nd March 2020 at 12:56 pm #4422 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      Yes, but the bottom line is: they were stuck in the past, they were both confused and unable to move on. Stephen R. was actually more than confused. When he visited his hometown, he felt at home, was peaceful even though sometimes his memory was contradicted. But when he was taken back to the institution, he was tormented. Jimmie wasn’t tormented (if tormented at all) as much.
       22nd March 2020 at 11:09 am #4330 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      Martyna 64134
      Participant
      (37.249.181.126)
      I wonder if he really was involved or was he following everyone as you do in church.
       22nd March 2020 at 11:27 am #4347 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
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      As the nursing sisters claimed, the mass could hold him completely. He could follow it with an uninterrupted focus for as long as it lasted.
       This reply was modified 7 hours, 52 minutes ago by admin.
      o 22nd March 2020 at 11:09 am #4331 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      weronikabielicka
      Participant
      (94.172.174.238)
      I’m good. My workplace is still open so that’s one positive of this situation.
      o 22nd March 2020 at 11:10 am #4334 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      KarolinaS
      Participant
      (188.147.101.40)
      That was an amazing text. While reading, I tried to imagine how I could handle Jimmy’s situation … and it was hard. Remember what it was a long time ago, and don’t remember what I ate for dinner.
      About quote:
      Although Jimmie has lost the ability to make a habit of storing in his memory the latest or most recent activities or events, he still, as a human, feels. He was sensitive to the world around him.
      Let us recall situation when he was on a visit to a doctor, whom he didn’t remember from the moment before, he looked in the mirror. I think he was really scared of what he saw. The old man he saw in the reflection was a stranger to him. He didn’t identify with him at all.
      Various emotions arose in him. Mainly confusion. He became frantic and panicked.
      Referring to the quote, I think it’s great for Jimmy’s case. Although, let’s call it illness, he did not lose himself as a human He still had self-esteem, felt satisfaction / joy, e.g. when he looked out the window, gazing with pleasure at the kids.
       22nd March 2020 at 11:13 am #4337 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      You said that he could feel satisfaction and joy, but Sacks observed that he was often apathetic and bored.
       22nd March 2020 at 11:23 am #4343 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      KarolinaS
      Participant
      (188.147.101.40)
      Yes, he said it, but it seems to me that in these small situations, however, he had signs of joy. We can say that he mainly felt it but let’s not reject other feelings. A grim man has his own character, but when he sees, for example, his child’s smile, he cannot help but smile. Jimmie, due to his case condition, could show moments of joy in such small situations.
      This range of emotions, regarding Alexander’s sentence Luria’s quote, also testifies that Jimmie had even the mentioned sensitivity
       This reply was modified 8 hours, 29 minutes ago by admin.
      o 22nd March 2020 at 11:24 am #4346 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      joanna.gutowska
      Participant
      (89.65.130.15)
      One thing really got me thinking about Jimmy’s behavior – the mirror test.
      He was sure he’s nineteen, while really being forty-nine at the time of first neurologist examination and the mirror check-up was a frightening experience for him.
      But I guess he must have seen mirrors his whole life after 1945 – at his home, in the toilet while shaving, in public places.
      Was he terrified every time he saw himself in a mirror? Or he got distracted by something else and forgot about it? What do you guys think?
       22nd March 2020 at 11:27 am #4348 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      KarolinaS
      Participant
      (188.147.101.40)
      Maybe he hadn’t thought about that before. He was just doing things. And this time the doctor pointed it out in a specific context.
       22nd March 2020 at 11:29 am #4349 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      Adrian B
      Participant
      (5.173.169.200)
      he had to been doing all those things you mentioned, but he simply forgot about it. Remember that Jimmy couldnt follow any converstations that have been in some sort of way paused and resumed
       22nd March 2020 at 11:30 am #4351 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      Iza65430
      Participant
      (5.173.178.141)
      Or maybe he forgot about it a few minutes after? Like in the doctor’s room. He just forgot why is he frightened
       22nd March 2020 at 11:30 am #4352 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      KamilaNiszcz
      Participant
      (78.31.151.151)
      Since he forgot such a things like shaving, he may forgot his face appearance too.
       22nd March 2020 at 11:32 am #4353 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      weronikabielicka
      Participant
      (94.172.174.238)
      I think that he had the same reaction every time he looked at the mirror but he just kept forgetting that he’s older than nineteen.
       22nd March 2020 at 11:35 am #4355 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      I think you’re right, Veronica. He didn’t catch up with his life. Every time his memories were contradicted, he was at a loss, but mercifully (for him) he forgot it withing minutes.
      o 22nd March 2020 at 11:40 am #4358 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      Do you remember, everybody, which memory was still functioning in him?
       22nd March 2020 at 11:43 am #4360 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      Martyna 64134
      Participant
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      Was that procedural memory?
       22nd March 2020 at 11:46 am #4365 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
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      Yes, but why do you think so? Is there any proof of it in the essay?
       22nd March 2020 at 12:00 pm #4380 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      Martyna 64134
      Participant
      (37.249.181.126)
      I think that this citation might prove it ‘He had two striking skills— Morse code and touch-typing. We could not use Morse, unless we invented a use; but good typing we could use, if he could recover his old skills—and this would be real work, not just a game. Jimmie soon did recover his old skill and came to type very quickly—he could not do it slowly—and found in this some of the challenge and satisfaction of a job. But still this was superficial tapping and typing; it was trivial, it did not reach to the depths. And what he typed, he typed mechanically—he could not hold the thought—the short sentences following one another in a meaningless order.’
       22nd March 2020 at 12:08 pm #4386 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      Indeed, touch-typing was a mechanical activity for him, but he preserved the skill itself.
       22nd March 2020 at 11:44 am #4364 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      KamilaNiszcz
      Participant
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      Episodic memory?
       22nd March 2020 at 11:46 am #4366 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      Was he able to rely completely on his episodic memory?
       22nd March 2020 at 11:50 am #4371 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      KamilaNiszcz
      Participant
      (78.31.151.151)
      You’re right, he wasn’t.
       22nd March 2020 at 11:53 am #4374 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      I’m not saying I am ?
       22nd March 2020 at 11:52 am #4372 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      Adrian B
      Participant
      (5.173.169.200)
      No, he was not, his memory was erased back to 1945 and then stoppped
       22nd March 2020 at 11:48 am #4369 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      joanna.gutowska
      Participant
      (89.65.130.15)
      Some parts of long-term memory – the one Martyna mentioned. Also semantic, and some pieces of episodic and autobiographical memory.
       22nd March 2020 at 11:57 am #4375 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      Yes, parts of LTM: episodic but up to 1945 (with some fragmentary memories from the 1960s), semantic (explicit) and implict. Give me an example of his preserved implicit memory. And what does “implicit” mean in the first place?
       22nd March 2020 at 12:09 pm #4388 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      joanna.gutowska
      Participant
      (89.65.130.15)
      Implicit means something that we’re not aware of, something unconscious. You don’t have to think about it, to remember how to do it, it’s happening automatically – how to tie your shoelaces for instance.
      For Jimmy, in my opinion it would be anything mundane like getting dressed, but also typing and using Morse code.
       22nd March 2020 at 12:25 pm #4397 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      True, what about sensory and short-term memory?
       22nd March 2020 at 12:35 pm #4405 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      joanna.gutowska
      Participant
      (89.65.130.15)
      Well, Jimmy has sensory memory but only up to 1945. His short-memory is damaged, as he cannot hold new information for more than a few minutes.
       22nd March 2020 at 1:56 pm #4441 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      No, it wasn’t sensory memory. Mind you, sensory memory has the shortest duration.
       22nd March 2020 at 12:38 pm #4408 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      weronikabielicka
      Participant
      (94.172.174.238)
      The sensory memory was still functioning in him but he Lost his short-term memory as he was able to type and do puzzles only if he was really fast.
       22nd March 2020 at 2:02 pm #4442 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      Yes, it was. It made it possible to repeat what someone has just said or to read a whole sentence in a book. Jimmie had it, but his STM was damaged, so nothing was committed to LTM.
       22nd March 2020 at 11:58 am #4376 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      Yes, parts of LTM: episodic but up to 1945 (with some fragmentary memories from the 1960s), semantic (explicit) and implict. Give me an example of his preserved implicit memory. And what does “implicit” mean in the first place?
       22nd March 2020 at 11:48 am #4368 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      KarolinaS
      Participant
      (188.147.101.40)
      As we know he didn’t have a family. However, how do you imagine how he would function if he had relatives?
      People after accidents also lose their memory and their families try to help them remember themselves. Or in connection with Alzheimer’s. What about him? How would that work?
       22nd March 2020 at 11:58 am #4377 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      RebekaDziekan
      Participant
      (89.64.78.0)
      It seems to me that it may be difficult for us to get into Jimmie’s situation, but it is much easier to imagine someone with Alzheimer’s, as this is quite common nowadays. Probably many of us know the person, maybe even a family member who is struggling with it.
      And those who do not have such experiences, I recommend watching the movie Still Alice. It’s a quietly harrowing portrait of a family losing the woman they know – and a woman losing herself.
       22nd March 2020 at 12:01 pm #4381 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      joanna.gutowska
      Participant
      (89.65.130.15)
      It’s a great movie, it can bring you to tears though.
       22nd March 2020 at 12:02 pm #4382 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      I also recommend this film. It’s a beautiful and moving portrayal of a woman with A.D.
       22nd March 2020 at 12:08 pm #4387 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      KarolinaS
      Participant
      (188.147.101.40)
      I think that everyone, and certainly women from this discussion :), know the movie “The Notebook”. It seems to me that it would similarly illustrate Jimmie’s situation if he had a family.
       22nd March 2020 at 12:00 pm #4379 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      joanna.gutowska
      Participant
      (89.65.130.15)
      I think he might function better with someone close to him, who could help him retrieve some memories, though it surely would be challenging for this person.
      At postscript there was a theory, that patients like Jimmy may feel better in surroundings they fossiled in – so if it was possible to move him to his hometown, maybe his memory would improve?
      Some of his symptoms resemble Alzheimer’s to me, for example, no memory of meeting people before. I have a similar experience with my grandma who has dementia. Sometimes when I visit her she treats me like a person she has never met before, sometimes she thinks I’m my mother or my sister. But her condition also affects her semantic memory – recently she forgot how to use kitchen utensils or how to use soap, which is extremely dangerous in the current COVID-19 situation.
      Sometimes it’s funny because she can act like a child, but at the end of the day, it’s kind of depressing that without memory we’re different people, slowly losing our selves.
      I really hope my mother and myself won’t have this problem in the future :O
       This reply was modified 7 hours, 55 minutes ago by admin.
       22nd March 2020 at 12:05 pm #4384 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      Are you saying that if we had no memory of our lives we would be different people?
       22nd March 2020 at 12:16 pm #4389 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      RebekaDziekan
      Participant
      (89.64.78.0)
      You wouldn’t be like yourself in any way. People learn and develop who they are as they grow. You wouldn’t have any recollection of this process and thus you wouldn’t have retained the information that you once did from it. I don’t think you could ever be the “you” that you were again. The situations would be different and inevitably so would you.
      Let’s just say that this statement makes any sense.
       22nd March 2020 at 12:20 pm #4392 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      It does make sense, however, we might be able to preserve the spirital part of ourselves (just like Jimmie G. did). We would preserve our personalities, attitudes, likes and dislikes – even though we wouldn’t remember why we like or deslike something – everything that constitutes a human being.
       22nd March 2020 at 12:23 pm #4395 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      RebekaDziekan
      Participant
      (89.64.78.0)
      Yes, it seems to me that our qualities and needs would remain similar, but they could develop somewhat differently.
       22nd March 2020 at 12:26 pm #4398 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      I see. Could you say something more about it?
      • 22nd March 2020 at 12:30 pm #4399 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      RebekaDziekan
      Participant
      (89.64.78.0)
      Most of our features personality traits are independent of us, but we can work on them constantly and hard. We will not change the way we were born. However, the environment in which we live and the events we experience can have a real impact on our perception of the world and goals in life.
      o This reply was modified 7 hours, 19 minutes ago by admin.
      o 22nd March 2020 at 12:41 pm #4411 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      I can see I’ve come up with nature vs nurture argument ?
      o 22nd March 2020 at 1:03 pm #4425 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      RebekaDziekan
      Participant
      (89.64.78.0)
      Seems like it. But to be honest, it is such a complex topic that it is difficult for me to clearly determine which side is true. I think they intertwine so smoothly that both types of argument can be accepted.
      o 22nd March 2020 at 1:26 pm #4432 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      True, it’s a tough question and volumes can be written about it ?
       22nd March 2020 at 12:22 pm #4394 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      joanna.gutowska
      Participant
      (89.65.130.15)
      I think so. Our memories make us who we are, they shape our behaviors and how we perceive people and the world around us.
      I believe that every milestone changes us – for instance when a woman is having a baby for the first time it surely changes her whole perspective, she acts differently from this very moment.
      If she lost her memory from the moment she had a baby, her life would never be the same. Her baby would feel terrible.
      I remember a story about a woman with multiple personality disorder, who has a daughter. It might be a totally different story, but I remembered precisely her daughter who was also interviewed for this documentary.
      Her mother had a lot of personalities that would „activate” at various times, and some of „personas” denied having a child, which was crushing for her daughter to hear.
      You can see it here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n2atzoaA2NI
       22nd March 2020 at 12:31 pm #4400 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      Thank you for the link. I will watch the documentary. This may be a different story, though. The woman you’ve mentioned suffered from dissociative identity disorder (the term “multiple personality disorder” is no longer in use in the medical context). The reason(s) why she forgot having a daughter is different from losing your LTM.
      But I understand your reasoning.
       22nd March 2020 at 12:16 pm #4390 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      Another thing, you wrote that if Jimmie were relocated to his hometown his memory could have improved. I’m not sure, after all he suffered atrophy of mammillary bodies. In other words, his mammilliary bodies were degenerated. You cannot, despite medical advancement, reverse the damage.
       22nd March 2020 at 12:23 pm #4396 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      joanna.gutowska
      Participant
      (89.65.130.15)
      That’s right. Organic changes are unfortunately irreversible.
      o 22nd March 2020 at 11:44 am #4363 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      KarolinaS
      Participant
      (188.147.101.40)
      implicit memory, i think
       22nd March 2020 at 11:47 am #4367 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      Can you give me an example?
       22nd March 2020 at 11:50 am #4370 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      Adrian B
      Participant
      (5.173.169.200)
      He still remembered Morse code and touch-typing
       22nd March 2020 at 11:59 am #4378 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      Of course. Adrian why did Jimmie lose much of his explicit memory but preserved the implicit one?
       22nd March 2020 at 12:20 pm #4391 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      Adrian B
      Participant
      (5.173.169.200)
      To be honest I have no idea whats the reason of that. In this case I need your help.
      I can only associate fact connected to Alzheimer`s disease, what I mean is that this disease at its begining also focuses episodic and semantic memory, then it takes away our procedural memory.
       22nd March 2020 at 12:21 pm #4393 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      Could anyone answer that question, please?
       22nd March 2020 at 12:34 pm #4401 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      KarolinaS
      Participant
      (188.147.101.40)
      For me, implicit memory means something that we will do automatically, without thinking and performing the same operation again. It is possible that only some corners of the memory have been damaged. Jimmie still believed that he had a was 19 years old. It is possible that the established patterns blurred the trace of explicit memory.
       This reply was modified 7 hours, 24 minutes ago by KarolinaS.
       This reply was modified 7 hours, 16 minutes ago by admin.
       22nd March 2020 at 12:44 pm #4413 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      Caroline, I’m afraid I don’t understand this part: “… possible that the established patterns blurred the trace of explicit memory.”
      • 22nd March 2020 at 12:49 pm #4418 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      KarolinaS
      Participant
      (188.147.101.40)
      establish patterns = repetitive actions so often that he no longer pays attention to them.
      What I meant was that he locked himself in a loop of fixed actions and had some sort of blockade against introducing new schemas.
      o This reply was modified 7 hours, 1 minute ago by admin.
      o 22nd March 2020 at 1:01 pm #4424 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      The part about established patterns was clear. I still don’t understand what do you mean by implicit memory blurring the trace of explicit memory.
       22nd March 2020 at 12:34 pm #4402 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      Martyna 64134
      Participant
      (37.249.181.126)
      It’s typical in amnesia that people lose explicit memory but retain much of implicit memory.
       This reply was modified 7 hours, 23 minutes ago by Martyna 64134.
       This reply was modified 7 hours, 14 minutes ago by admin.
       22nd March 2020 at 12:45 pm #4415 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      Yes, it’s very common. But why?
       22nd March 2020 at 12:39 pm #4409 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      KamilaNiszcz
      Participant
      (78.31.151.151)
      Implicit memory doesn’t require conscious recall, it means that Jimmy didn’t have to think hardly about the things he was going to do, he done it mechanically even he didn’t remember he done it before.
       22nd March 2020 at 12:46 pm #4416 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      Yes, of course. I think that everybody agrees with it. But why does a person with severe explicit memory loss retain his implicit memory?
      • 22nd March 2020 at 12:51 pm #4419 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      Iza65430
      Participant
      (5.173.178.141)
      Maybe it is because of that we learn a lot of things in the first few years. Like in Jimmy’s case – he thought he is still 19 years old so he could do everything he has learned to this age.
      • 22nd March 2020 at 12:53 pm #4420 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      joanna.gutowska
      Participant
      (89.65.130.15)
      Maybe because they don’t have control over it anyway?
      o 22nd March 2020 at 1:09 pm #4427 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      No, the thing is that explicit and implicit memory are stored elsewhere in the brain. Explicit memory is stored first of all in the hippocampus whereas implicit memory in the basal ganglia. We’ll be talking about it in the future ?
       This reply was modified 6 hours, 48 minutes ago by admin.
      o 22nd March 2020 at 1:11 pm #4429 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      joanna.gutowska
      Participant
      (89.65.130.15)
      Okay ?
      • 22nd March 2020 at 1:04 pm #4426 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      Adrian B
      Participant
      (5.173.169.200)
      Implicit memory operates through a different mental process from explicit memory. Explicit memory is strongly connected to our emotions and feelings. Amnesia ‘attacks’ using stress these two factors and thats what makes people suffering from it losing their episodic memory
      o 22nd March 2020 at 1:33 pm #4434 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      Dear All, the topic won’t be closed so if you want to add something to our discussion you’re very welcome.
      I have started another topic where I would love to read your opinion.
      I’d like to remind you of Mock Exam 2 which is waiting for you. In a couple of days I will upload a test on Learning – please take it as well. Moreover, I’d like you to study the material from “Memory” (the whole unit) in your textbook as well as the material in this site. I’d like to meet to all next Sunday, the same hour, though I will visit this topic to see if you have written anything ?
       This reply was modified 6 hours, 24 minutes ago by admin.
       22nd March 2020 at 1:36 pm #4436 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      joanna.gutowska
      Participant
      (89.65.130.15)
      Is it possible to retake the Mock exam? I’ve done poorly ?
       22nd March 2020 at 1:46 pm #4438 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      Poorly? You scored 73%. It’s a good result. When everyone takes it, you may have another take on it ?
      o 22nd March 2020 at 2:05 pm #4443 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      Thank you for the discussion. Have a good Sunday and take care of yourselves!
       This reply was modified 5 hours, 53 minutes ago by admin.
       This reply was modified 5 hours, 44 minutes ago by admin.
      o 22nd March 2020 at 2:33 pm #4446 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      Michal 63376
      Participant
      (213.108.152.34)
      I think the other interesting aspect of this chapter is style of neuropsychologist jobs. It’s have to be awesome experience when “your everyday” duty is like adventure ? You discover something new which no one know yet. You discover something completly new which no one know yet. I really like fragment “What could we do? What should we do? There are no prescriptions,’ Luria wrote, ‘in a case like this. Do whatever your ingenuity and your heart suggest.”. You have to be governed by professional ethics but moreover you have “carte blanche”. Neuropsychologist jobs(I believe) it’s very responsible and satisfying(in those days at least).
       This reply was modified 5 hours, 24 minutes ago by Michal 63376.
      o 22nd March 2020 at 2:35 pm #4448 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      Michal 63376
      Participant
      (213.108.152.34)
      I think the other interesting aspect of this chapter is style of neuropsychologist jobs. It’s have to be awesome experience when “your everyday” duty is like adventure ? You discover something new which no one know yet. You discover something completly new which no one know yet. I really like fragment “What could we do? What should we do? There are no prescriptions,’ Luria wrote, ‘in a case like this. Do whatever your ingenuity and your heart suggest.”. You have to be governed by professional ethics but moreover you have “carte blanche”. Neuropsychologist jobs(I believe) it’s very responsible and satisfying(in those days at least).
      o 22nd March 2020 at 11:08 am #4328 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      I’m not infected so in that I’m Ok ?
      How about you, Rebecca? What do you think about Luria’s quote?
      o 22nd March 2020 at 11:13 am #4336 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      RebekaDziekan
      Participant
      (89.64.78.0)
      I agree with this statement. The man still had his own character traits, was kind and had a sense of humor. In fact, memory problems were a bigger problem for his environment than for himself.
      o 22nd March 2020 at 11:21 am #4341 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      weronikabielicka
      Participant
      (94.172.174.238)
      But he said that he doesn’t feel anything and didn’t know if he enjoys Life.
      o 22nd March 2020 at 11:24 am #4345 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      RebekaDziekan
      Participant
      (89.64.78.0)
      Most of the time, however, he remained unaware of his condition. There were times when he admitted that he was not feeling well, but he still wanted to live.
      o 22nd March 2020 at 11:33 am #4354 Edit | Move | Split | Bin | Spam | Unapprove | Reply
      admin
      Keymaster
      (213.136.245.202)
      Exactly. Even if he reaslised something was off, he forgot it after a few minutes. He wasn’t aware of that fact that he had lost his self.

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