18th May 2024

“Brain storms” by Jon Palfreman (Year 1 Thur.)

ENGLISH FOR PSYCHOLOGY Forums Neuropsychology “Brain storms” by Jon Palfreman (Year 1 Thur.)

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    • #7256
      admin
      Keymaster

      Has the book broadened your perspective on neurodegenerative diseases, in particular Parkinson’s disease (PD)?
      Was what the most surprising/interesting information that you’ve learnt?

      Before you take part in the discussion, watch the short video on Pamela Quinn’s Parkinson Movement Lab.

    • #7257
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I have learned about neurodegerative diseases on my biology lectures. But it was interesting to learn only about Parkinson’s disease. I have never heard about history of researching this disease. I liked the most the part, which showed how Parkinson got to know more about it asking pepole on the street in London.

      • #7260
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        Iga, I totally agree with you. I learnt something about neurodegerative diseases at biology lesson, but reading about researches and how all experiments about those diseases went was something new.

        • #7269
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Was it shocking for you when the author had mentioned the people with the Parkinson’s disease? I was thrilling thrilled when he said about a man who worked for NASA!

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      • #7268
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        Yes I agree with you because it’s hard to find such a good history part about this case.

        • #7284
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Do you know anyone with this disease?

          • #7332
            Anonymous
            Inactive

            Actually i don’t know but if i do i’ll have a broader perspective on this disease

          • #7446
            Anonymous
            Inactive

            I knew my grandma, and i knew many facts about it, but still i could learn something from the text.

            • #7523
              admin
              Keymaster

              I’m sorry to read it. I didn’t realise that PD might have affected your life as well.

      • #7289
        admin
        Keymaster

        Iza, how did you like your biology classes and what neurodegenerative disorders did you learn about?

        • #7323
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          It’s interesting and unbelievable, how a lack of one substance (neurotransmitter or hormone) can destroy your brain. We have learned about Alzheimer’s disease, Kluver- Bucy syndrome and many others but I don’t remember the names ( there are plenty of them).

          • #7379
            admin
            Keymaster

            This is a truly fascinating branch of neurology and neuropsychology. Have you ever wished to study medicine?

            • #7416
              Anonymous
              Inactive

              I wanted to be psychiatrist, but it is hard to get to medical university. Chemistry isn’t my forte. Studying psychology is more interesting I think. I’m interested in the human brain and his thinks??, not much in anatomy. Learning the names of bones in latina is difficult and boring.

              • This reply was modified 4 years ago by admin.
              • #7486
                admin
                Keymaster

                I thought so 🙂 We’re going to study the brain and its main structures and functions in Year 2. I hope that we’ll return to classroom-based learning by the time.

      • #7295
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        You’re right Iga, the whole process of researching was really interesting. I wonder how many people approached by Parkinson qestioned his sanity

    • #7258
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Honestly, this book was quite difficult for me and it wasn’t easy to understand everything, especially about brain and L-dopa. Despite that, I probably know more about Parkinson after reading “Brain storms”. In my opinion the most interesting chapter is about group therapy. It’s sad that people are afraid to tell their families that they have Parkinson disease. Group therapy is a place where they can express their feelings and thoughts.

      • #7264
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I agree with you. For me also it was the most interesting and surprising chapter.

      • #7274
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I agree with you. It must be very hard to show other people, thaat you need their help. That’s why group therapies are so important – you know you ahve other people’s support and that they undersand what you’re going through

      • #7290
        admin
        Keymaster

        Why are some people with PD reluctant to come out to their families and friends?

        • #7319
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          I think they want to be perceived like people without any diseases. They try to live a normal life and they don’t want compassion from others. Maybe they can’t reconcile themselves with to the fact/ come to terms with the fact that they are ill so they believe that it will be also difficult for their relatives.

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        • #7349
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          I don’t have Parkinson and I don’t know anyone who have this disease so it’s hard for me to say. I reckon that it’s hard for them because they might be afraid of people reaction. Maybe they think that family or friends will reject them or change attitude towards them. Also, people with Parkinson disease may think that it’s their “weakness” and they don’t want to show that they are weak.

        • #7462
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Perhaps they don’t want to lose their current states of relationships. Everybody can react in their own way – some of them may get confused or shattered and start to isolate, some may become overprotective – and it can be really difficult, as well as disappointing, to find someone understanding. It’s better to keep the status quo and come out only to those fully trusted.

      • #7294
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I think that the group therapy is really good. You could say your story and everyone know how you feel. I think it is really helpful for people with PD.

        • #7472
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Yeah, and I loved the way they all felt united in the fight. The power of social support is tremendous and it’s uplifting that people in difficulties don’t give up but try to help each other, basing on their experiences. If only those who feel all alone could get reminded about this and encouraged to try to trust others again.

      • #7308
        admin
        Keymaster

        Patricia, students at your level should expect to receive different types of texts. Some of them may be more challenging than others.

        • #7370
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Yes, that’s true. It was a great occasion to learn new and rarely used medical words. Maybe in futer they will be helpful to describe other diseases.

      • #7335
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I also think that was the most interesting chapter, actually I didn’t realise before that telling about the PD may be such a big problem, now I completely understand it. About the group therapy I’ve seen in before in movies or books, and it also interested me how it works in real life.

        • #7385
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Group therapy is also very intriguing for me. Sometimes I wonder if group therapy is as effective as normal therapy.

    • #7259
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      The book has broadened my perspective on neurodegenerative diseases, because I haven’t really learned much about it before. I learnt some new informations information from this text, for example that shaking hands isn’t the only symptom of Parkinson’s disease. It was also very interesting to read about some researches about Parkinson.

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      • #7261
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        However, this book was difficult to read because it has many wide medical vocabulary and sometimes it was hard to understand.

        • This reply was modified 4 years ago by admin.
        • #7331
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          I agree, this book was very interesting but sometimes hard to understand. However, I’ve learned new vocabulary.

          • #7493
            Anonymous
            Inactive

            yes, there were a lot of difficult medical terms, that sometimes I didn’t even understand in Polish 🙂

    • #7262
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      In my opinion the book was a little bit boring. It was quite hard for me to read this book, because of medical terms and vocabulary. However, before reading I knew almost nothing about Parkinson’s disease. This book made me realize that. I didn’t know how different it could be for different people. What positively surprised me was the community around Parkinson’s disease.

      • #7272
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        What do you think about meeting with those who had Parkinson disease ?

        • #7293
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          I think that it is a very good idea. Thanks to these meetings people could support each other.

      • #7279
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I had the same feeling about the book, it was quite hard to understand for me becouse because of the medical terms and also with the amount of text. However this lecture was very informative for me, the person who had no previous contact with PD.

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      • #7282
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I agree with you, it was hard for me too to read that book, but thanks to that book I know more about Parkinson’s disease

        • #7287
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Exactly, medical terms very really hard to understand in this book.

      • #7310
        admin
        Keymaster

        How different can PD be for different people, Martha?

      • #7514
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        It’s amazing how people support each other in difficult times. Positive atmosphere of their meeting gives them hope and thanks to that they don’t give up.

    • #7263
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I have known a little bit about Parkinson’s disease earlier because my grandmother has this illness. I saw how it has changed her and her life. Thanks to the book I had the opportunity to understand her world better.

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      • #7320
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        That’s right. It is quite interesting to read about such disease when someone from our family suffers from it. It is also easier to understand Parkinson’s disease when we can observe it by see it with our own eyes.

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        • #7346
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Yes, exactly. She has a lot of difficulties due to PD for exactly she falls over or breaks glass sometimes but she don’t reconcile that it is caused by illness. She said then for example “I’m so clumsy!”. I think it will be easier for her when she understand that accidents like this will be happend and it isn’t her fault.

      • #7330
        admin
        Keymaster

        I’m very sorry to hear it, Nataly. How is your grandma doing? Does she belong to any Parkinson’s organisation or movement workshops similar to Pamela Quinn’s labs?

        • #7397
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          No, she isn’t. I think there is no such organisation where she lives.
          At the beginnig it was really hard because her condition was getting worse and doctor didn’t know what it could be. But when she found the right doctor and she began to take varoius medications her condition is stable.

          • #7487
            admin
            Keymaster

            You can say that her condition has stabilised.
            Would you buy your granda a video with Pamela Quinn’s workshops? Do you think your grandma would benefit from it?

      • #7340
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I haven’t known anyone with Parkinson’s, but because it’s quite common disease, I think we should at least recognise its early symptoms.

        • #7425
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          I agree with you Agnes but sometimes it can be difficult to recognise syptoms.

    • #7265
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I’ve learned some about neurodegenerative diseases in high school, it’s always been interesting and hard for me to read.This book was very interesting too because it was written by a person who has this serious disease and his perspective, thoughts and so one??. Also very fascinating part was I found the history of P.D and this the part about walking to the beat of music very interesting. I also think also that parts with special medical terms was were a little bit hard to understand.

      • This reply was modified 4 years ago by admin.
      • #7367
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I also learned about neurodegenerative diseases in school but those information were very sketchy and I think it is a big problem in our society because if our knowledge is so modest then when we meet somebody that suffer from e. g. PD we don’t know how to behave and even what to say to that person

      • #7395
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I found it also very good thing that this book was written by a someone with Parkinson disease, because it gives us certain that he prepared his book with as many facts and information as he could. It is also about his disease – his life, so he did it also for himself (what he said in the begining of the book).

    • #7266
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Reading this text I was a little bit confused, cause I had a problem with understanding some words. Any way it was very interesting, and I realized how fascinating it is. I always thought the only thing about Parkinson is shaking hands. This book also made me read about Parkinson something else online. The thing that surprised me the most was the experiment with chair and placebo effect. It is always so interesting how we can manage our body to do something..

      • #7281
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I thought the same! only shaking hands. I didn’t know that the people with parkinson’s disease can’t walk or stand up from their beds. Horrible

      • #7283
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I agree with you, this placebo effect is very interesting. Also this picture of this special chair was a very good idea that the author placed it

      • #7300
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I feel the same way. I was also always associating Parkinson disease with shaking hands. Experiment with chair was really surprising and it showed me that placebo might be an effective treatment (of course, not always).

      • #7305
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        Kinga, do you know anyone with Parkison’s disease? Or have you ever seen someone with this disease?

        • #7315
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          I think so, cause my great-grandmother had this disease, but I don’t remember her that much. The only thing I remember is she thought that my older brother is her grandchild-my uncle.To me it was pretty funny then, cause I was a kind and I haven’t realized why was it happening all the time.

      • #7351
        admin
        Keymaster

        That’s true. People’s minds are very susceptible to suggestion, Kinga 🙂 You’ve mentioned shaking hands as one of the symptoms of PD. What’s the more technical name for it?

        • #7543
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          I guess it is hand tremors

          • #7544
            admin
            Keymaster

            Yes, of course.

      • #7352
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I didn’t know much about PD disease before and thanks to this book I’m more aware. Now I know that shaking hands are not the only symptom.

    • #7267
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I enjoyed the first four chapters of “Brain Storms” and it for sure has broadened my perspective on on neurodegenerative diseases, especially Parkinson’s disease. Books like this one are my favorite kinds of books – the ones that present some medical issues, but not in a textbook kind of way. The book engrossed me so much, that now I feel the need to read more on this topic. Jon Palfreman’s writing style seemed really enjoyable and despite all of the medical terminology, the book was a pleasant and informative read for me. It made me realise how little I knew about Parkinson’s disease and now I’m very glad that I had a chance to read it. It struck me how differently people experience Parkinson’s and how distinctly it evolves for every case.

      • #7369
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I agree with you. The fact that the autor has Parkinson’s disease made the book’s content more fascinating. It wasn’t simply about the disease, it was about the people with it. Thanks to that a reader has a diffrent aproach.

        • #7421
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          You’re right. I also think that without the author’s subjective comments, anecdotes and writing from his perspective this book wouldn’t be so captivating.

      • #7375
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        Yes I agree with you it was very suprising how differently people experience Parkinson’s. Also I learnt that it can start even when you are quite young like 30 years.I always thought that it was elderly disease.

        • #7423
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          I also used to think that. It’s really surprising and quite terrifying how unpredictable human brain is and how unknown many neurodegenerative diseases are.

    • #7270
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Yes, this book has broadened my perspective on neurodegenerative diseases. I knew about those kinds of illnesses, but I have never read more about them, because I was always interested in other diseases and no one from my family suffered from that. I found in those chapters many new and interesting inromations information about Parkinsosn’s disease, but the one thing that was really intriguing for me were ideas of new therapies for patients – “shaking chairs”.

      • This reply was modified 4 years ago by admin.
      • #7361
        admin
        Keymaster

        Mary, do you see yourself working with people with PD? What makes you interested in this disease in the first place?

        • #7441
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Yes, I think that I could work with these people, but I would prefer to help people with mental diseases. That’s why I’m study psychology. Anyway, I found really interesting that it is connected with lack od dopamine and that young people can suffer from this disease.

    • #7271
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      It definitely broadend my perspective on neuroldegenerative diseases, because I didn’t know much about them. I was very intrested in this lecture – it opened my eyes for how Parkinson’s disease affect peoples life. But for me the fact how they tried to treat them with medicine and how that affected their future was the most shocking thing I have learned.

      • #7318
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I agree with you. The whole aspect of the story about L-dopa, all of its side effects, motor complications and how it affects people’s lives was shocking for me as well. It’s also interesting how L-dopa can be called “advanced” in comparison with other neurodegenerative diseases. Unlike Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s or many other diseases, PD has L-dopa, which is not a cure, but it’s “at least something”.

      • #7520
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        Probably everyone knows about Parkinson’s, but few is truly aware of the complications. Life with this disease ia not easy. Often people are too embarrassed to inform about their struggle.

    • #7275
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Yes, it definitely has, because until now I have learnt only about that lack of dopamine is somehow connected with this disease. Now i know that it affects functioning of substantia nigra and then basal ganglia. I did not know also that heroine could cause parkinson’s, but the most interesting to me was the information that smoking and drinking coffe may protect us from coming down with parkinson’s, it was shocking to me, because smoking it is thought to be unhealthy.

      • #7291
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        Omg, it shocked me too. My entire life my parents told me to do not drink coffee, and smoke cigarettes, and now it is said to be protection from parkinson

        • #7307
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Well I guess some things are poison for one and medicine for others. Still, I didn’t think that cigarettes are one of them

      • #7298
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I agree, this information about smoking was very surprising. I never thought that cigarettes can have a positive effect on our health.

      • #7365
        admin
        Keymaster

        Nataly, what do you remember about the basal ganglia? What is this brain structure responsible for?

        • This reply was modified 4 years ago by admin.
      • #7388
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        It is shocking for me as well, but I think smoking has more disadvantages than advantages, so I’ll stay with drinking coffee from time to time.

      • #7412
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I was shooked too. I always thought that smoking isn’t helthy at all. Despite that, I still think that smoking has more cons than prons.

        • #7439
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Exactly, I’d rather not to risk having lung cancer to protect myself from PD. Drinking coffee seems to be more rational and less harmful.

      • #7434
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I agree that this is information is something unique and change a little bit perspective on smoking cigarettes but in my opinion it still has more disadvantages than advantages.

    • #7276
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I was supprised that this disease can appear even in a person’s 30’s. I always thought it was older people’s problem

      • #7297
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I used to think that too. The only time I saw a young person with this disease was in the movie “Love and other drugs” , but it was just a movie. Have you heard about it?

        • #7350
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          No, I haven’t. what is it about? how did it picture the disease?

          • #7390
            Anonymous
            Inactive

            It’s about relationship between two totally different people and some difficulties they have to deal with. It’s kind of romantic story. And one of the main characters suffers from this dissease (it’s played by Anne Hathaway). Honestly, I have seen long time ago so I don”t exactly remember how this illness was pictured, but there was showed that she was able to live kind of normal life.

        • #7424
          admin
          Keymaster

          Have you watched “Back to the Future” with Michael J. Fox? If not, watch it when you have some spare time.
          It’s a very entartaining movie. Anyway, Micheal J.Fox might have had PD at the time, even though he was not diagnosed yet. As you probably learnt from the book, an individual may have this disease even for some time before he/she becomes symptomatic.

      • #7304
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        The author mentioned even 22 year old young man who has a parkinson’s.

      • #7311
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        Me too. I thought Parkinson’s disease affects people around 60 years old.

      • #7321
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        Yes, he mentioned the NBA star Brian Grant, who was diagnosed at age of 36, and the Major League Baseball Ben Petrick, who learned his fate at age of 22.

      • #7371
        admin
        Keymaster

        No, it can affect everyone, although it’s more prevalent in geriatric population. Does the name Michael J.Fox ring a bell?

      • #7373
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        It is a little bit scary, isn’t? It shows us that everyone should study Parkinson disease a little bit at least, because we do not know when we can become ill.

    • #7277
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Yes, this book has broadened my perspective on neurodegenerative diseases – now I know now more symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. It was really interesting how many studies and experiments were conducted to get the cause of the disease and the treatment.

      • #7341
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I agree. In public space there is, in my opinion, not enough information about this disease. Most of us know only a few difficulties that people with PD face but there are mamy more and I think that mass media should talk about it more and more often

      • #7355
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I agree with you. I enjoy all these experiments. It shows us that people realy care about Parkies and try hard to find a Cure.

    • #7278
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Before reading this book I had just basic knowledge about neurodegenerative diseases. I knew that PD existed but this book opened my eyes on problems which people with Parkinson have. The most surprising for me was history of the young group of people, who got PD because of a bad batch of designer heroin.

      • #7286
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I agree with you. Fact that a bad batch of designer heroin can have such consequences was really surprising. I didn’t know that drugs can cause such illness like PD.

      • #7377
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        It is suprising for me as well that a bad batch of designer heroin can cause Parkinson’s disease. I knew that it has a lot of bad consequences, but I didn’t about that particularly.

    • #7280
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I already knew bits and pieces about PD but it wasn’t much until i read that book. Now I know that it is caused by black stuff dead (neurons dying) and because of that is causing lack of dopamine (a brain chemical) – unfortunately we don’t know what is the cause of this. I also didn’t know that patients can help themselves with PD through dancing and it really amazes me. I started to think even more that we need to find the cure for this, because it is one of the most destructive diseases.
      The most interesting information was the therapy through vibrations and it was confirmed that it was only placebo, but what interested me was the thinking behind this. Doctors they invented the armchair which was vibrating and it was supposed to help them with PD and they came to that invention by observing that patients feel better when they are in train or riding a horse.

      • #7288
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        This dancing part of the text shocked me too! That’s amazing how we can control our brain

        • #7306
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          And when I watched the video about Pamela it was visible that she was so passionate about helping people with PD because she is also suffering from it. I agree with you! I didn’t even know we can control our bodies that much.

          • #7389
            Anonymous
            Inactive

            I also was quite suprised when I learnt that dancing and music could help. Then I thought that the case of disembodied lady was kind of familliar. She also had to think strongly about doing things like hand lifting to really do it with her body.

      • #7301
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        Yes, I agree. I was also very interested in the ‘placebo’, which plays a big role in Parkinson’s disease.

        • #7309
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          I think that the placebo effect is interesting. We are not sure how it works because one day you can respond to it and the other you don’t feel anything changing.

      • #7313
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I was amazed about the part of this ‘dancing therapy’, it is interesting how people can manged with theirs difficulties

    • #7285
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I’ve learned a lot from “Brain storms”. I’m honestly suprised with the lack of knowledge I had in Parkinson’s disease topic. Now I know about more Parkinson’s symptoms than just shaky hands, I also know more about medical background of the disease. What suprised me the most was the fact that even a teenager can have Parkinson’s disease and that it can be a conseqence of a mistake in producing drugs.

      • #7322
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        yes, I was really surprised that not only elderly people have suffer from this disease but also really young people

        • #7449
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Yes, I also was very surprised that young people can have this diseaese. I didn’t know that drugs can cause PD

    • #7302
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      This book definitely broadened my perspective on neurodegenerative diseases. To be honest, my prior knowledge of prakinson was not very wide. I was most interested in chapter 3: “The case of the frozen adicts”. I didn’t know that specific toxins contained for example in drugs can cause symptoms similar to those of parkinson’s disease. I think the case of George Carillo’s is very interesting. It must be awful feeling to lose control of your body and feel like frozen.

      • #7317
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I would say that George was a prisoner of his body, because it was certainly a trap. People must have been thinking that he is not able to think or feel. He must have been thinking that no one can help him.

      • #7327
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        Chapter 3 was really interesting. It is shocking how one chemical can ruin your life. I agree that it must be awful to lose control over your body.

      • #7333
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I think the worst thing is that it happened so fast and was so unexpected, he had no time to prepare for it at all

        • #7354
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Do you think that if it wasn’t so unexpected, he could prepare for it somehow?

          • #7366
            Anonymous
            Inactive

            I don’t think anyone could fully prepare for something like this, but maybe with some more time given he would kind of prepare mentally for some aspects of his new life. I cannot imagine how hard it was for him

          • #7372
            Anonymous
            Inactive

            I don’t think we can prepare for all situations in life. Unfortunately, diseases often surprise people suddenly and change their reality. However George Carillo contributed to his situation because he took drugs. It’s irresponsible. Nevertheless, it is sad that he had to pay such a high price for his youthful mistakes.

            • #7398
              Anonymous
              Inactive

              I think you’re right. He brought this on himself, yet I can’t hep but feel sorry for him

        • #7359
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Exactly. It must be very difficult to get used to the new situation when we are so suddenly losing the life functions we have enjoyed throughout our lives.

    • #7312
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      This book has broadened my perspective on neurodegenerative diseases a lot. I learned a lot of new interesting things about people who suffer from such diseases. The most surprising information for me was the fact about those young people addicted to drugs, that their minds did function properly but they were unable to use and control their bodies. It was really moving that they was in the full bloom of their youth and they couldn’t benefit by their lives. Some of them died at so young age, it’s extremely horrifying in my opinion

      • #7338
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I agree. This story taught us much why taking drugs is so dangerous.

      • #7356
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        This part of taking drugs was schocking how one decission can changed whole life so dramatlly

    • #7314
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      In my opinion the book was hard to focus on and I had difficulties with some words but overall it showed me how little did I know about Parkinson’s symptoms. I didn’t know that dancing can help to control PD, so I found it really interesting and surprising.

      • #7348
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        Wiktoria, how dancing helps people with Parkinson’s disease?

        • #7378
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          It was said that dancing helps control our bodies, it’s really important for people with PD because they get to know their bodies and have better balance. What is more I think those dance classes are much more than only physical activities, all of the participants have this disease, including the choreographer, so I’m sure they are bonding there because they understand each other.

      • #7382
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I agree with You. For me the problem with this book was that I’m not very nterested in Parkinson disease and that’s why sometimes while reading it I was somewhere else. I find more interesting for example Korsakoff’s syndrome but all in all it wasn’t that bad.

    • #7324
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      To be honest this book really hard to understand because of a lot of medical terms which I’m not really familiar with even in Polish. This forced me to focus on trying to understand all those vocabulary not on enjoying the story. But it does open my eyes to a different perspective of discovering an illness. I’ve always thought that people write about a disease about its symptoms and some time later, someone just come up with an idea of how to treat it. This book showed me that it’s not that easy. It takes time to fully understand the disease and finding the right treatment is a trial and error method.

      • #7404
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        Right, the medical vocabulary was quite difficult, but beside it I think the story was interesting. It’s unbelievable that 200 years after discovering Parkinson’s, people still don’t have a cure without side effects.

      • #7410
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        Yes and it is so hard for those afflicted with PD to make a decision: “should I take those medicines? Those pharmaceuticals may help me now but no one really knows how my organism will act in the future after taking them. But if I don’t try, I will never know.”

    • #7328
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I only knew that people with Parkinson’s have problem with trembling hands. My perspective has been broadened by the book, becuase I’ve learnt more about this disease. The story of Parkinson’s disease is quite intriguing, I didn’t know about the cures and their side effects.
      The very interesting thing is that people can “fool” the brain and be able to function quite normally.

      • #7374
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        When I read it I thought that side effects it’s something that occurred in the past and as the medicine moved forward there are no side effects anymore. I was so shocked when I realized that there is still no simple medicine without side effects for this disease.

      • #7387
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        Agnieszka, I was also strucked by the fact that people are able to control automatic motions due to consciousness. It makes me wonder what mechanism hides behind and whether we will ever figure it out, because after all both conscious of unsonscious processes happens in one organ, the brain.

    • #7329
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Thanks to this book I boardened my knowledge about Parkinson’s disease. Now I am more aware about the symptoms. Also, „Brain Storms” helps me understand problems that people with PD experience in their daily life. I was surprised and moved by the passage about group therapy, when patients said that they had been ashamed or scared to tell their friends, family and employers about their disease.

      • #7347
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        Yeah, this part was really moving. They were afraid of how other people would react to their disease.

        • #7360
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          This also shows how difficult this disease must be, if people are scared to tell about it even their relatives.

          • #7381
            Anonymous
            Inactive

            i think that one of the reasons why they are scared to tell even their families about their disease is that they aren’t reconciled with this tough situation and they don’t want to be treated differently e. g. like disabled

    • #7334
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      The book showed me some characteristics of neurodegenerative diseases. I did not know much about them before. I have always connected Parkinson’s disease primarily with shaking hands so it broadened my picture of this disease. What suprised me was that the surveys about Parkinson’s disease started a really long time ago. Also, the treatment methods like shaking chair, vibration helmet or a role of placebo.

      • #7368
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I also used to think that Parkinson’s disease is mainly connected with shaking hands. I learned more about Parkinson’s symptoms when I watched “The Good Wife” in which Michael J. Fox played an attorney who suffers from this condition. Do you know any famous people who have Parkinson’s?

        • #7468
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Yes, I heard about Michael J. Fox too. Also, I know that Pope John Paul II had Parkinson’s disease. There are couple of names in the book and I remember astronaut Rich Clifford.

    • #7339
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      In my opinion, this book was a little bit boring. I have never been eager to learn biology because it is difficult to learn for me. On the other hand I learnt some news thinghs about Parkinson. For example that this disease is associated with a lack of dopamine. What is more, all these experiments with animals and humans remind me a psychology a little, because in psychology making a experiment is a common thing.

    • #7342
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      When I was in high school I always hated biology classes so I have never learned about any neurodegenerative diseases. At collage I had to learnt about the brain but still this book was very instructiv. For me the most suprising was situation in which fifty- eight year old male Parkinson patient was cycling. It was very bizarre because he had troubles with walking and then after a few minutes he was riding a bike. Now I know that people with Parkinson are able to produce movements where automaticity hasn’t been lost. Their dilemma about L-dopa traetment was also very interesting and hard. Is it worth to take it and be able to do most of actions without trembling and other symptoms with a cost of “on and off effect” or confusion, paranoia etc.

      • #7362
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I find it also interesting and shocking that people with Parkinson’s disease have troubles with some actions, but some of them, for example cycling, are not a problem.

      • #7386
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I agree with you, Zosia. It was shocking for me that some patients could smoothly ride a bike, but couldn’t really walk normally. Human brain is so mysterious and uncanny in so many ways.

        • #7406
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Yes and now I’m starting to appreciate that my brain have the ability to do things uncounsciously. Like it’s amazing that I can talk and cook at the same time without making an effort.

    • #7344
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Above all, the book showed me Parkinson’s from its humane side. The author’s remarks and recollections enabled me to empathize with people suffering from this disorder and I found out there is a way to get used even to something so worrisome as neurodegenerative illness. But perhaps it is possible due to gradual Parkinson’s development.
      The other thing were the symptoms. I haven’t realised the course of the disease may differ so much from person to person, as well as the age of getting ill or the survival. Also, I was impressed by the ease to diagnose the illness. Before I thought it is far more complex, and besides it appeared to me to occur less often in the society.

      • #7431
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        Julia, I also liked the book’s perspective. A disease is not only symptoms and statistics. People have to lead a life like everybody else and deal with difficulties associated with the disease. They are very brave trying to not give up hope.

        • #7508
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          I love your sympathetic way of looking at being ill and totally agree that a disease is not symptoms or statistics – these are only facilities to deal with the illness at the social level, but unfortunately it is too often forgotten.
          Yes, they are very brave, like ordinary heroes. Human life despite the difficulties is worth living, because it seems even a disease is not a sufficient reason to lose hope.

    • #7345
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      The book has broadened my perspective and knowledge about neurodegenerative diseases, in particular PD. Frankly, I have never been interested in this disease and I have never looked for informations. Due to the book, I am now more aware.
      I find Pamela Quinn’s case the most interesting. She used her dancer’s wisdom to help herself and others. Quinn became more aware of her body. It is extraordinary that people find different ways to deal with the disease.

      • #7409
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I think she is very inspiring. Her dance training gives her a unique position in fight with disease. Thanks to her, many people can improve their mobility.

    • #7353
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Book “Brain Storms” broadened my perspective on Parkinson disease but I already had some knowledge about this from life, books, school. The most interesting that I’v learnt from this book were history of discovering this disease. I like reading about people and how they got to something new, for example inventions or thoughts.

      • #7363
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I also am interested in discovering something new. Inventions can show us how people was thinking in the past.

      • #7364
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        It is fascinating how many researchers were engaged in the process of finding reasons why people come down with parkinson’s and also finding solutions how to cure this disease. Because in parkies is still hope that this condition can be cured.

    • #7376
      admin
      Keymaster

      What are the symptoms of PD?

      • #7402
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        Drooling is a symptom of advanced Parkinson’s disease

      • #7411
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        The main symptoms of PD are tremor, slowed movement called bradykinesia, speech changes, rigid muscles, writing changes.

        • #7429
          admin
          Keymaster

          Good. And what do you call these writing changes?

      • #7413
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        The most common are tremor, problems with speech, balance and movement.

      • #7418
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        The symptoms are: tremor, rigidity, slowness of movement, postural inbalance also it is small handwriting and hypomimia (the facial expression is lost or diminished).

        • #7430
          admin
          Keymaster

          Small or shrinking handwriting. This symptom has its own name, do you remember it?

          • #7436
            Anonymous
            Inactive

            I think it was called micrographia.

            • #7438
              admin
              Keymaster

              That’s right!

      • #7442
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        There are many symptoms such as: tremours,postural imbalance, slow down movements, rigidity, hypomimia, small hand writing.

      • #7478
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        Symptoms of Parkinson disease are: hand tremor, shuffling, stooped posture, expressionless face, speech changes.

    • #7380
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Most common symptoms are tremor, impaired posture and balance and bradykinesia

      • #7383
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        but also speech and writing changes

        • #7437
          admin
          Keymaster

          What do you call these writing changes?

          • #7461
            Anonymous
            Inactive

            I read that because of the problem with controling muscle tension, people tend to have a hard time writing properly – this causes them to write smaller and indistinct letters

    • #7384
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Some of the symptoms are tremors, rigidity, slowed movements, loss of automatic movements and speech changes.

    • #7391
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Four main symptoms are tremor, poverty of movement, rigidity and postural instability, there is also small handwriting and facial masking

    • #7392
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      It was also amazing that some people with Parkinson’s disease don’t give up and fight .For example, the author mentioned a Canadian celebrity Tim Hague Sr., a Parkinson’s patient who has against all odds won the reality show The Amazing Race Canada.

      • This reply was modified 4 years ago by admin.
    • #7393
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Even though I already knew some things about Parkinson’s disease the book broadened your perspective on it still. For me the movie was more interesting than book (probably because of the language), but i learned more information from book. This book helped me understand more about the disease and how hard it is to live with it.
      I didn’t know that dancing can help patients and it was very nice to watch how Pamela Quinn helped others and danced with them.

    • #7396
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      In most cases – tremor, postural instability, speeach changes

    • #7399
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      The symptoms of PD are tremor, rigidity, slowness of movement, postural imbalance, small handwriting, and loss of facial expression.

    • #7400
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      My favorite part of the book is definitely Pam’s history. I love music and I am interested in art theraphy so I was amazed how dance helped her. Also, I have so much respect for Pam becouse of her work for other people with this disorder. It must be so hard to teach someone while struggling with the same problems. It is like double fight with this disease.

      • #7463
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I agree. This part is my favorite too, and Pam is really strong woman.

    • #7401
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Symptoms of PD are slowed movement, imparied posture and balance, writing and speech changes

    • #7403
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Symptoms of PD are movement changes, changes in writing, changes when speaking and tremor

      • #7445
        admin
        Keymaster

        Sure, and what about swinging hands? Do you remember what Palfreman said about it?

    • #7405
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Despite difficulties in understanding story caused by medical terms, this book broadened my perspective on neurodegenarative diseases a lot. Before reading this book, I didn’t know much about Parkinson’s disease. For instanse I wasn’t aware that there are so many symptomps and that different people can have different symptoms, not in the same time. One people can have mild symptoms for 8 years or more and other can’t function after 3 years of a diagnosis. The most surprising I’ve learnt is that L- dopa which supossed to treat, can also cause many side effects like motor impairments or hallucinations.

      • #7422
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I agree with you. It shows us that a road to cure is very difficult.

      • #7428
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        Yes and the story of Pamela Quinn was very interesting. She has been suffered from PD for 18 years, but her hard work helped her maintain wellness

      • #7435
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        It’s so interesting that there are people that have PD a short time and have really advanced symptoms and some that struggle with the disease for a long time can have mild symptoms. And in my opinion, the fact that people have different responses for the treatment can make it harder to cure the disease.

      • #7444
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I agree with you, L-dopa is really controversial cure. I think that having Parkinson’s disease must be even harder than it seems if those people decide to take such a dangerous medicine

        • #7460
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          I agree with you Irmina. I think that there aren’t a lot of types of medicine to cure PD. That’s why poeple take such a dangerous medicine. They prefer to get better for a while despite the awareness of side effects.

          • #7470
            Anonymous
            Inactive

            I feel so sorry for them, I cannot imagine making this kind of decision. There is no such thing as good choice in Parkinson’s disease. All you can do is choose path that in your opinion is less painful

            • #7499
              Anonymous
              Inactive

              Beautifully said Irmina. The worst part about this disease is that even if you choose a path that is less painful, you still have PD. It’s sad that there is no medicine that would cure this disease entirely.

    • #7414
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      People affected by Parkinson’s disease are slowed down. They experience muscle stiffness, and their finger, hand or limb shakes.

    • #7415
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      There are a lot of various symptoms of PD but it could be for example: tremor, loss of automatic movements, speech and writing changes.

      • #7443
        admin
        Keymaster

        Do you remember the part about swinging hands?

    • #7417
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Major symptoms are tremors, rigidity, slowed movements, loss of automatic movements and speech changes. It is really a scary for me to think that some people have to live with it. I can only imagine how live has to be difficult during the final stage of PD.

      • #7427
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        It must be a real challenge for them to cope with all this difficulties and trying to live normally

      • #7433
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        What scares me the most is that other people can tell something is wrong but they think this person is an alcoholic

    • #7420
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      The most common symptoms of PD are tremor, slowed movement, speech changes, writing changes and loss of automatic movements

    • #7426
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      There are many symptoms of this disease. Most people only know about tremors and I was one of them before reading “Brain storms”. Slowed movement, impaired posture and speech changes are also symptoms of P.D.

      • #7448
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        As you said there are a lot of symptoms of PD, but most of us knows only a few. In my opinion it is essential to teach people about such diseases because as one of the members of the support group said: sometimes people may perceive those ill ones as drunken or under influence of drugs

    • #7440
      admin
      Keymaster

      The thing that shocks many people is the paradoxes of Parkinson’s disease. What are these paradoxes?

      • #7450
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        That they are not able to walk, but still can ride a bike or ice skate.

      • #7455
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        People with PD can ride a bike even if the are not able to walk.

      • #7476
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        They can’t walk but they can ride a bike. For me paradoxical was also when Bonnie said that she is much happier than she was before, but I’m not sure if it’s common or if it was just one case.

      • #7500
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        To me the most striking paradox was that despite the malfunctions of more primal brain structures – that are basal ganglia – can be skipped or maybe rather compensated by the conscious activity of cortex and the automatic body signals can be broken down. The power of humane consciousness is a mystery, but unfortunately we all know how much mental effort it demands – what is visible especially while learning new things.

      • #7517
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        For example they have difficulties in walking but they can ride a bike

    • #7447
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I’m not sure if I’m right but it might be the fact that they are usually are disabled to walk but they don’t have problem with e.g ride riding a bike.

      • This reply was modified 4 years ago by admin.
      • #7451
        admin
        Keymaster

        Yes, indeed.

        • #7459
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          It’s difficult to understand how it works because walking seems easier than riding a bike or running.

          • #7485
            Anonymous
            Inactive

            Yes for me it’s really intriguing as well. I thought that cycling is neurologically harder because you have to e. g keep balance while sitting on a vehicle with just two wheels so it’s really easy to fall over, but it’s seems that I was wrong 🙂

    • #7452
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      It is probably the fact that some people affected by PD can run, ride a bike but they aren’t able to just walk.

    • #7454
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      One of the paradoxes is a fact that for people with PD walking seems to be harder than cycling

      • #7458
        admin
        Keymaster

        How to explain the fact that walking is more demanding than cycling or ice skating?

        • #7464
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          In the book explanation is that cycling is neurologically simpler task than walking. In riding the bike you have the same movement in both legs. When person is walking its easier to lost synchronization of movements, you have to move your legs in different directions.

        • #7475
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Cycling is easy because of similar legs movement when a person pedals. Walking is harder because you have to synchronized everything and also you can loose lose your “time symmetry”

          • This reply was modified 4 years ago by admin.
          • #7494
            admin
            Keymaster

            Good answers, both of you. Who would have thought that cycling or running is neurologically much easier than walking? That’s also surprising, isn’t it?

    • #7456
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      The paradox is that people with PD are often not able to walk but they can do things that they learned really well and come to them automatically like ice-skating, riding a bike, or running.

      • #7466
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        It’s quite amazing that the people have problem with walking, but when they think about dance, it makes walking easier.

    • #7457
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Fact that they can’t walk but they can ride a bike shocked me

    • #7465
      admin
      Keymaster

      What was the “Case of the Frozen Addict” and how was it related to MPTP?

      http://openvault.wgbh.org/catalog/V_474CF2C8A20B4173988486AC4C605A3C – You may want to watch it 🙂

      • This reply was modified 4 years ago by admin.
      • #7484
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        “Case of the Frozen Addict” is third chapter of the book “Brain Storms” we read. MPTP is a is a powerful neurotoxin which could induce Parkinson’s.Barry Kidston was making his own drugs and he wanted to make MPPP (Demerol) but by accident he made MPTP. This case was related to the MPTP because it was in the heroin that these adicts took and it induced Parkinson’s. On the other hand, for researchers, it was really helpful in research their study on PD.

        • This reply was modified 4 years ago by admin.
        • #7496
          admin
          Keymaster

          Right. We should also remember that MPTP was a contaminant. Barry Kidson made a mistake and the same mistake was repeated by a careless chemist.

      • #7490
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        MPTP is a chemical compound wich causes irreversible symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. Toxins in drugs go to the brain and make people “frozen”.

    • #7467
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      That’s the fact that people with PD often can’t walk, but they can ride a bike or skate.

    • #7473
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      MPTP causes permanent symptoms of Parkinson’s, because it destroys dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of the brain. The group of young people, who were drug addicts, could not move or talk, their faces was expressionless after taking MPTP.

    • #7477
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      This was a case of a few addicted people who were taking heroin and then had symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. And MPTP was the contaminant in the heroin.

      • #7497
        admin
        Keymaster

        Good answer, Veronica. Do you remember what happened to these “frozen” addicts?

        • This reply was modified 4 years ago by admin.
        • #7503
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          One day, they stopped moving and talking, they were stiff – like made of wax, their faces were expressionless, and the doctors didn’t know what was wrong with them.

    • #7482
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      It’s like being frozen by taking drugs. The book describes George Carillo’s case. He could see people and hear noises, but he could not say anything or move his head. The neurologists thought it was a psychiatric disorder. It was a neurological problem anyway. The symptoms were similar to those of Parkinson’s disease.

      • #7492
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        What suprised me is that for a long time both neurologists and psychatrists tried to prove it’s not a case in their field, I thought it’s gonna be the opposite way

      • #7501
        admin
        Keymaster

        Indeed. If you’d like see what these people looked like and what their symptoms were, you may watch the video I’ve linked.

    • #7483
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      They wanted to make MPPP, but by accident they made MPTP. After taking it, they started to have symptoms of Parkinson’s.

    • #7489
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Case of the Frozen Addict is a story about people who bought drugs which were of uncertain origin. It came out that the substation substance which was supposed to be an MPPP was in fact MPTP. MPTP was then was a suspect for being the cause of Parkinson’s symptoms which “the frozen addict” have experienced.

      • This reply was modified 4 years ago by admin.
    • #7504
      admin
      Keymaster

      How does Pamela Quinn, the ex-dancer, trick the brain to deal with dyskinesia? What do you think about the Parkinson’s Movement Lab she runs? Is it useful or maybe everyone with PD can learn those techniques on their own?

      • This reply was modified 4 years ago by admin.
      • #7529
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I think that movement lab is a very graet idea and also is another way to explore to help people with PD. She gave them opportunity to controle they movement with the music. It’s very good idea and maybe it should be a subject to testing.

      • #7535
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        Pamela Quinn used music to deal with her own dyskinesia and help others with it. She was more expirienced with controlling her body so she decided to help others. She said that people with PD should treat their brains like muscles and make them flexible and because of this they could control their movement more and deal with dyskinesia better.
        I think Parkinson’s Movement Lab is really good idea because it shows other people with PD that they are not alone with their disease.
        It is really useful to learn those techniques because they can, at least, reclaim a bit of control over their body. They can learn to live with PD.

        • #7536
          admin
          Keymaster

          What advice does she give to people who experience on-off effects?

    • #7507
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      The case of Frozen Addict is about six drug users who had symptomps of Parkinson’s disease. Their body frozed froze. The reason why they experienced PD symptoms is that they used heroin with a contaminant called MPTP mistake MPTP with MPPP.

      • This reply was modified 4 years ago by admin.
    • #7510
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I think it gives them more control over their body, but also gives them feeling they can somehow live with the disease and subjugate control it

      • This reply was modified 4 years ago by admin.
      • #7519
        admin
        Keymaster

        What exactly, Dominica, can people learn in her lab? Can everyone with PD benefit from it or maybe only those with subtle symptoms? What do you think?

    • #7511
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Pamela Quinn is an extraordinary case because she is an ex-dancer. It means that she can control her body and movement better than an average person. It was probably very difficult for her when she realised that she has P.D. Fortunately, she didn’t give up and she runs Parkinson’s Movement Lab. I reckon that this is a fantastic idea to help other disabled people, especially when you know how they feel. Rehabilitation and mental support is very important.

      • This reply was modified 4 years ago by admin.
      • #7516
        admin
        Keymaster

        Patricia, I can see that your writing has improved and that you are more willing to express your ideas. Well done!

    • #7518
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      She said that many of her tricks depend on music. For example she made a piece of music, which fits her stride when she’s outside. And when she steps over the lines on the sidewalk—she uses that as a visual cuing system to help keep her stride.
      I think that the Parkinson’s Movement Lab she runs helps other people get used to the thought that they are not alone in this disease, that they have support. I think that her techniques can be useful to others, which doesn’t exclude the fact that everyone can learn their own ones.

      • #7521
        admin
        Keymaster

        That’s a very good answer. Would you encourage people with PD to join her lab?

        • #7522
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          I think that everyone should make this decision on its own, but I would recommend her lab to people suffering from Parkinson’s disease, because it could be a really good and helpful experience for them.

          • #7524
            admin
            Keymaster

            Is it more about movement techniques or rather being in the company of other people with PD? Or maybe both? Another thing, could people in more advanced stages of PD benefit from her workshops?

            • #7527
              Anonymous
              Inactive

              I think both. Learning new movement techniques can improve the comfort of their everyday lives and being with people with PD can help them socialize. People in more advanced stages of PD, for example those who don’t walk, won’t have benefits from the workshops like others, so probably group therapy would be better for them.

              • #7534
                admin
                Keymaster

                Yes, you’re right. Besides we have to remember that PD starts as a – generally speaking – movement disorder. It ends as a movement and cognitive disorder. In the last stages people with parkinsonims develop dementia whose symptoms are similar to those of Alzheimer’s disease. It’s obvious that at this point they can’t participate in any workshops.

    • #7525
      admin
      Keymaster

      What did you learn about L-dopa?

      • #7533
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        It is use as a treatment oy people with P.D, but the use of increasing doses causing side effects, it also can pass through the blood-brain barrier.

      • #7540
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        L-dopa is a medicine for PD but it has side effects, even worse that the disease alone, for example: dyskinesias, confusion, agitation, paranoia, and hallucinations. L-dopa can cross the blood-brain barier. This medicine gives people taking it, normal present but not as good future because of the side effects.

        • This reply was modified 4 years ago by admin.
    • #7526
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I’ve learned that it can cross blood-brain barrier, and it’s a huge challenge for scientist to accomplish in many substances that would be helpful in a fight with different mental disorders. However, there is a lot of side effects, like paranoia and hallucinations

      • #7531
        admin
        Keymaster

        I think it was Jon Palfreman who wrote “the cure was even worse than the disease.” At the time the he was writing the book, he was on a dopamine agonist not or L-dopa. Why?

        Also, you should remember that L-dopa once it crossed blood-bariers was converted into dopamine.

        • #7537
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Scientists disovered that after a “honeymoon period” patients displayed new, worse side effects like involuntary writhing movements of the arms, legs, or head called dyskinesias, confusion, agitation, paranoia, and hallucinations. And over time the drug became less and less therapeutic and had to be taken in higher doses and more frequently. Almost all patients taking L-dopa were sentenced to future disabling motor complications. So I think that’s why Jon Palfreman wrote that’the cure was even worse than the disease’.

          • #7539
            admin
            Keymaster

            Yes, a sad thing about L-dopa is that it stops working. Can you image a person who got better thanks to it, so they are full of expectations and hope and then after some time (be it days, weeks or months) they not only relapse but their conditon becomes even more disabling. So it’s kind of trade between a better today and a worse tommorow.
            That’s why Palfreman wasn’t taking L-dopa at the time he was writing the book.

    • #7530
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      L-dopa is a substance that slides through the blood-brain barrier and produces anti-parkinsonian effects. But it has also side effects like high blood pressure or nausea.

      • #7532
        admin
        Keymaster

        Indeed, but the side effects are usually even worse. Please refer to my post #7531.

    • #7541
      admin
      Keymaster

      Dear All,

      thank you for the discussion. I’ve linked two videos in this topic: one about P.Quinn’s workshops and the other about the “frozen” addicts. Some of you may want to watch it.
      The topic stays open so that you can follow up with more posts, not only about PD but any other neurodegenerative disorder. As always, I’ll come back later to catch up with what you have written.

      Talk to you later!

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