29th November 2023

“The Disembodied Lady” (Year 1 Thur.)

ENGLISH FOR PSYCHOLOGY Forums Neuropsychology “The Disembodied Lady” (Year 1 Thur.)

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    • #3867
      admin
      Keymaster

      Discuss Christina’s case in the context of  Ludwig Wittgenstein’s quote: “The aspects of things that are most important for us are hidden because of their simplicity and familiarity. (One is unable to notice something because it is always before one’s eyes.) The real foundations of his enquiry do not strike a man at all.”

      • This topic was modified 3 years, 8 months ago by admin.
      • This topic was modified 3 years, 8 months ago by admin.
    • #3889
      admin
      Keymaster

      Hello everybody! Let’s start the discussion. The floor is yours 🙂

      • #4039
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I have to admit that I am struck by this story, because it shows how our bodies are complicated and mysterious. It also shows that we take our lives for granted, but the truth is that we don’t know what will come next, we can lose everything at the moment.
        I’m impressed by Christina’s acts and behaviour. I can’t even imagine how difficult must be life without proprioception, but in my opinion she handled it really well. She was fighting bravely for a “normal” life. Although people were looking at her like a freak and she had worse days, she was always bold and gutsy. She is very inspiring.

    • #3890
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Our senses might be cooperating and maybe vision is the most important, the one which manages all of them. I think that, because when Christina lost her proprioreception she could not move her legs or arms without using her vision.

      • #3894
        admin
        Keymaster

        Hi, Nataly. Why do you think sight is the most important of all senses?

        • #3916
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Because, when the other sense such as proprioreception stopped working vision was responsible for partial recovery of this function. In Christina’s case it was also audition which helped with living more normal life.

    • #3891
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      As Ludwig Wittgenstein said “things that are most important for us are hidden”. We can’t notice some of the things because they are always there. That’s exactly how the sense of proprioception works. It’s automatic and unconscious.
      Christina’s case is strange because she lost something she didn’t realise she had. And when she lost proprioception she started to appreciate the life she used to live.

      • #3896
        admin
        Keymaster

        Why was Christina’s case strange? What does it mean that she was “disembodied” or “pithed”?

        • #3913
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Christina had a normal life like anybody else. One day she recognised she can’t feel her own body without knowing before that it’s even possible. For me it’s strange to lose something that we didn’t know can be lost or even we had it.
          Disembodied is the lack of ability to feel own body, to feel our body as proper to us. She can’t feel her body unless she look at it.
          Pithed means having the spinal cord damaged.

          • #3951
            admin
            Keymaster

            That’s right. Would it be possible for you or me to lose proprioception? What do you think?

            • #3969
              Anonymous
              Inactive

              I think it is possible because the reason has a foundation in human physiology. “Purely sensory neuritis, affecting the sensory roots of spinal and cranial nerves throughout the neuraxis” was the cause of Christina’s state.

    • #3892
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      The statement is true for both physiology and psychology – we take for granted every small thing until we are not able to use it anymore. It can refere to small things such as watching tv every day, to (as in Christinas case) one of our senses

      • #3910
        admin
        Keymaster

        Dominika, do you remember why and when Christina lost her proprioception? What life did she lead after the loss?

        • #3917
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          it all started with a dream – she had an odd dream (she said she had never had one like it before) that she couldn’t feel her body. the next day the dream came to life. for a very long time she didnt have any control over her body unless she was looking at specific parts that she wanted to move. after some months she stared to gain control in actions such as walking, sitting in the bus but it wasn’t a normal life – she couldn’t do thins such as talking while eating

          • #3935
            admin
            Keymaster

            Yes, you right. She did have this disturbing dream, but there was a medical reason why she lost proprioception. If you don’t remember, please refer to the essay.
            Then, I would like you to respond to my post in bold (below) and write about your impressions about the essay, Chritina’s case, her struggle with life and anything you’d like to share with us.

            • #3949
              Anonymous
              Inactive

              she was admitted to a hospital because of an abdominal pain. she was supposed to have a surgery. the dream happened the night before the operation – the doctor said it must have been a pre-operative anxiety

              • #3952
                admin
                Keymaster

                Yes, she was scheduled for gallbladder removal surgery, but it wasn’t the reason why she lost proprioception.

                • #3959
                  Anonymous
                  Inactive

                  it was an acute polyneuritis

                  • #3978
                    admin
                    Keymaster

                    Yes, it was.

    • #3893
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I think Wittgenstein’s quote is a good summary for Christinas case. The fact we don’t pay attention to proprioception doesn’t mean it is not there.As we can learn from the text it’s impossible to live a normal life without it.

      • #3899
        admin
        Keymaster

        How would you define proprioception in the first place?

        • #3905
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          According to the text it is our hidden sense, thanks to proprioception we can feel our bodies as our own. I would simply define it as sense of orientacion, something we use to integrate information from our other senses.

          • #3912
            admin
            Keymaster

            Yes, you’re right. Proprioception is the sense of feeling your body in space. Thanks to it, you know where your hands or legs are located. What made Christina lose this sense?

            • #3925
              Anonymous
              Inactive

              Her problems started the day before her removal of the gallbladder, with her disturbing dream of being unsteady on her feet, which came true later on. Then it turned out she had sensory neuritis, and it caused her to lose proprioception. It’s also worth mentioning that Christina was not taken seriously by psychiatrist who simply diagnosed her with anxiety hysteria.

              • #3928
                admin
                Keymaster

                Yes, you right. Can you also explain what is polyneuritis and anxiety hysteria, please?
                When you do so, can you respond to my question in bold?

                • #3942
                  Anonymous
                  Inactive

                  Polyneuritis is inflammation of several nerves at the same time, it can cause for example loss of reflexes.
                  Anxiety hysteria is one of many anxiety disorders, it’s like anxiety but with physical symptoms such as heart palpitations and breathlessness

    • #3895
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Christina lost something that she even wasn’t aware she had it. She lost feeling of her body. We don’t think about such familiar things. Propioception is one of thing about which is Ludwig Wittgenstein’s quote – something basic and most important. It’s unthinkable that she never feel her own body again! Maybe that’s why doctors had suspected mental illness at first. It was more probable and available.

      • #3901
        admin
        Keymaster

        Before you read “The Disembodied Lady”, were you aware of your own proprioception? Can you share with us your reflection on the essay?

        • #3908
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          I had read this text before some time ago so now I think about it sometimes. When I have read it first time I was really suprised that illness like that even exist. It’s terrifying that one day you are healthy and you live a normal life and the next one your nightmare comes true.

          • #3914
            admin
            Keymaster

            I wouldn’t call it an illness just as I wouldn’t call the loss of the sense of vision or hearing an illness. What did you find the most interesting in the essay?

            • #3929
              Anonymous
              Inactive

              I think the most interesting is Christina’s attitude. She didn’t give up and she learnt how to live without proprioception.

              • #3937
                admin
                Keymaster

                Yes, you’re right. She never gave up even though life was tough for her and she had her moments of despair.
                Please, refer to my question in bold (below) and write about your impressions of the essay.

    • #3897
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I agree with you all. Ludwig Wittgenstein’s quote refers to important things that are hidden, that aren’t in front of our eyes and I think proprioception is one of them. Christina’s case shows that proprioception – our hidden ‘sixth sense’ is one of the most important foundations of ourselves. She lost this sense and it had a huge impact on her life.

      • #3904
        admin
        Keymaster

        Are there other “hidden” things that we take for granted and we only appreciate them when we lose or going to lose them? Tell us something about Christina. What made her lose her proprioception?

        • #3918
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Other hidden things that we take for granted are all of our senses (the foundations of our ability to get to know the world around us), they may be also our relationships, our general abilities and probably many more.
          I don’t think that we can be sure what made Christina lose her proprioception. It happened after she had sort of a ‘premonitory dream’. And it could have been triggered by her pre-operative anxiety.

          • #3920
            admin
            Keymaster

            Actually, we can be pretty sure about what made her lose proprioception. Have a look at the text.

            • #3930
              Anonymous
              Inactive

              The cause of her loss was sensory neuritis. When I said that we can’t be sure, I was thinking of a more general reason or cause, not really about the diagnosis.
              But I get it now that the sole cause of it was this sensory polyneuropathy – sensory neuritis, which affected ‘the sensory roots of spinal and cranial nerves’.

              • #3938
                admin
                Keymaster

                Exactly, by the way, dreaming about losing proprioception the night before she lost it was very strange, wasn’t it?

                • #3939
                  admin
                  Keymaster

                  Please, refer to my question in bold and write about your reflection on the essay. Did you enjoy it in the first place? Why, why not?

    • #3898
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      her case shows, how connected everything in our body is – all of our senses cooperate in order to make us able to do even the simpliest things, such as walking. when she lost her proprioception she was unable to walk or carry things unless she was looking at them

      • #3932
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I agree with you, because we aren’t thinking about our connected body on a daily basis and Christine’s story can make us think about it more. I think It can also show that we don’t think we have something important untill we lose it.

    • #3900
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Christina had to focus on on the simpliest things like keeping fork in her hand. It shows that actions that are very easy to do can be a huge challange and require a lot of concentration from us.

    • #3902
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I think that it shows that people are managed by their brain without even realizing how that work, which is very fascinating.

    • #3903
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Luwig Wittgenstein said that “The aspects of things that are most important for us are hidden because of their simplicity and familiarity” and i think that this is true in most cases – including Christina’s. She didn’t realise how important perception was to her until she lost it, then she saw how huge impact on her life it had.

      • #3947
        admin
        Keymaster

        Hi Sandra, thank you for your voice in the discussion. Please refer to my question in bold and write about your personal reflection on the essay.

    • #3906
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I was not aware of my proprioreception so when i read the text i was shocked, because Christina lived a normal life so that issue can happen to everyone and it severely influences our lives.

      • #3970
        admin
        Keymaster

        How common is the loss of proprioception?

    • #3907
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      We consider our bodies as our property. Because of proprioception, ‘our sixth sense’, we feel them, we control them and it’s familiar to us. Christina lost the ability to control her body, something she didn’t know she had. She wasn’t aware of the importance of propioception, which was always before her eyes.

      • #3948
        admin
        Keymaster

        Agnes, are there many people who have lost their proprioception?

        • This reply was modified 3 years, 8 months ago by admin.
        • #3972
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Christina was the first ‘disembodied’ person. Now there are some hundreds of cases. There are different causes of similar symptoms.

          • #4032
            admin
            Keymaster

            I’m not sure if there are hundreds of them, but you can easily and fortunately – for a brief period of time – lose this sense if you overdose on vitamin B6.

    • #3909
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Ludwig Wittgenstein’s says “The aspects of things that are most important for us are hidden because of their simplicity and familiarity. It fits to Christina`s case because after she lost the sense of proprioception she starts to appreciate simple things in her life like gentle feeling the wind on her body. This case also teach us not to take life for granted.

      • #3919
        admin
        Keymaster

        Susana, what was Christina’s life like before and after the loss? Can you imagine losing proprioception? Would you be able to live a relatively normal life then?

        • #3936
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Christina had a normal life, typicall for 27 years old woman. She was a loving mother, successful worker, having many passions. She loved her life. After the loss her life turned upside down. She couldn`t see her body itself. She has to learn how to move by using her eyes. There was no improvement at the begining but after some time she could automaticly move her body, addapt to social life, travelling by bus etc.

          I cant imagine losing perception.I coudnt live without it. Not feel, experience normal daily activites.
          I think that just like Christina i would get used to that type of life. I woud try to appreciate every moment of my life, an try to stay positive.

    • #3911
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Words written by a philosopher, Ludwig Wittgenstein, in Christina’s case took on a new, more physiological meaning. She began to actually feel (without feeling) his words in a less methaphoric way. Wittgenstein claimed, that one can’t appreciate a value of many things, when still having them in front of their eyes. Meanwhile, for Christina, seeing things was the only way to control her body.

    • #3915
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Ludwig Wittgenstein’s quote, for me, means that we don’t think about something, we already have, untill we lose it. For example, nobody thinks about being able to see until they lose their sight. Of course we know we see, but we don’t think about it all the time. “The Disembodied Lady” was about something like that, but this woman “loses” all of her body; she stopped feeling that her body belongs to her. When I looked at Christina’s story I started to contemplate what would I do in her situation, without the feeling that my own body is mine and only thing i can do is try to live with it because i can’t change it. Her case was interesting to me because she was the only one that has this condition.
      What do all of you think about it?

    • #3921
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      After Christina lost her proproception, she wasn’t able to do daily activities just like before, she had to be very focoused and very carefull in everything she did. Referring to Wit​t​gen​ste​in’s quote Christina has never thought so scrupulous about such easy activities like for example using fork and spoon cause everybody know this things very well

    • #3922
      admin
      Keymaster

      Everybody, what is your personal reflection on the essay?

      • This reply was modified 3 years, 8 months ago by admin.
      • This reply was modified 3 years, 8 months ago by admin.
      • #3944
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        It was really interesting. Her story makes me think what I would do in her situation and the case was so strange and exceptional that i wanted to read more and more. I can say that this text made me realize that we don’t think about something, we already have, untill we lose it. I also feeled pain of not treating her like people who need some understanding or help because she don’t look like other people or aren’t showing special appearance like people who have some kind of disability, like blind people. I myself have disability and it is not much visible because it concerns muscles (they are really weak, especially in legs). People don’t think about something that is inside of other humans. Is it a disability or something else and they don’t think about what is inside of them most of the time. They thing they will be healthy all of their lives but nobody knows what is going to happen and i think they are just afraid of thinking that something can be hidden and still exists. Christina’s approach made me believe that we should be positive in our lives when we can.

      • #3961
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        The essay was very eye-opening and it made me reflect on many things that I take for granted in life. The story was well written and it showed the whole process of Christina’s story. It was very informative and helpful for me.

      • #3962
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I was not aware of something like proprioception, so when I read that essay I was quite amazed how complicated is human body. I mean, there are so many connections, processes and every single piece of our body is so important. Enough that one of them is missing or broken and the rest is not working properly. During reading “Disambodied Lady” I started to wonder if there is more things like proprioception, which we do not know about but it is essential. There is something more in Christina’s case that I find interesting. It is the fact that she had a dream about her state without proprioception. This leads me to the opinion that dreams are not just random activation of the brain.

        • #3973
          admin
          Keymaster

          Hi Agatha, I think there are more “things” that we aren’t aware of, but we suffer when we lose them. I’m talking about neurology, but those “things” are all over the place and may concern our private life, general health and so on.
          Yes, the dream was somewhat disturbing 🙂

      • #3968
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        To sum up my general view on the essay I found it to be an inconceivable example and at the same time a proof of human strength and pereseverance in struggling with difficulties. I admire Christina for her effort to learn how to function all over again, despite possible yearning the old thriving life and a must to designate her new identity. It’s unbelievable how she just managed to trust herself and believe in gradually building her reality again. I was an uplifting reading to me, resetting my faith that there is always an attainable resolution provided that we want to accomplish it. It seems it’s always better to consider one’s strengths than weaknesses 😉 and simultanously it all brings me to a reflection how much and what do I really want to realize…

      • #3971
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        For me is very touching because “loosing your own body” is something unimaginable and her case is also motivating cause she had some worse moments but never give up. It is also touching because of the society and the way she was treated by other people. It shows also that disability that is noticeable f.e. Being blind or using orthopaedic bullets, is more understandeable for society than f.e. neurological issues

      • #4010
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        It must be some kind of nightmare, waking up one morning without perception of your own body. What scares me more, if proprioception is like the eyes of the body, and it fails – we can compensate it by using vision, but what would happen if we were actually visually impaired? Reading text like this should reminds us about the value of health. On the other hand, being permanently aware of every single process taking place in one’s body would be extremely overwhelming. In that case, being „unable to notice something because it is always before one’s eyes” may be nothing else but brains way to prevent an overloading.

    • #3923
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Referring to Ludwig Wittgenstein’s words people don’t pay attention to things they have, but only when they lose something, they start to appreciate it. Christina was in the same position. She had lost proprioception and then realized how important it was in her everyday life. Even though Christina had started “new life”, she accustomed to it and tried to lead a normal life.

    • #3927
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      When I read the text I was thinking that loosing senses might be one of the worst thing that can happen to people, because they cannot live normal life without it as if Christina did not.

    • #3931
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      After reading the essay I started to imagine life without the sense of proprioception. But it turned out unimaginable for me. I’m not sure I would be that motivated to find the strength to live as normal as it’s possible in spite of many difficulties.

    • #3933
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      In my opinion the essay if really valuable. It reminds to reader that we cannot think about our health as about something given forever. It’s also great source of medical knowledge.

    • #3934
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      To me the Wittgenstein’s quote sounds quite bitterly if referred to Christina’s case. It’s like some of us need to lose something not realized to even exist so that we, as mankind, would get to know the thing at all.
      But I don’t think our ‘blindness’ makes us any poorer or worse. We can learn what is important only through gaining experience… it’s a pity this process sometimes demands a loss of normal life. I believe the trouble with our human blindness begins when we start to forget what is crucial…

      • #4033
        admin
        Keymaster

        Well said, Julia. I just hope we are not going to find what’s really important to us through losing it. It’s our health that we usually don’t appreciate enough until it deteriorates.

    • #3940
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      We shouldn’t take our health for granted. Because of our busy life, we often don’t take care of it. Christina’s case reminds us that we should appreciate, what we have. Additionally the text draws attention to the situaction of the people with disability. They deserve more understanding, less harmful comments.

    • #3941
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I think this essay was something I should read. It made me think about what I have now. I become more greateful for my health and abilities I have. Also, I think I should start taking care of myself more, becouse no one knows if i will be healthy forever.

    • #3943
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      It must be some kind of nightmare, waking up one morning without perception of your own body. What scares me more, if proprioception is like the eyes of the body, and it fails – we can compensate it by using vision, but what would happen if we were actually visually impaired? Reading text like this should reminds us about the value of health

    • #3945
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      For me is very touching because “loosing your own body” is something unimaginable and her case is also motivating cause she had some worse moments but never give up. It is also touching because of the society and the way she was treated by other people. It shows also that disability that is noticeable f.e. Being blind or using orthopaedic bullets, is more understandeable for society than f.e. neurological issues

    • #3946
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I’ve actually read it about 5 years ago, but in polish. It was very nice to refresh that memory – now, that I’ve learned more about psychology and neurology I understood more. It was very interesting, nicely written, but it made me think about things I normally dont aprreciate, like my abbility to walk or carry a cup of tea. It really opened my eyes

    • #3950
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I`m glad i had a chance to read this essay. It reminds us that not everything is given to us forever, that we have to enjoy every moment of life, to be gratefull. I also learnt that despite adversity we can not give up.

      • #3955
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I agree with you 100%. I think we should be more aware of passing time and be gratefull about what we have.

    • #3953
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I think this essay is really touching. Christina’s story is really interesting and it make us think about it. It shows that people are often in bad situation but they are able to deal with it. It is really motivating.

      • #3974
        admin
        Keymaster

        Maybe they have no choice but to move on and make the best of their lives? People are quite flexible and they adapt to new situations and conditions.

    • #3954
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Christina was just living her life. But when she lost her proprioception she stated seeing value in activities, that had seemed small before this accident. I think it’s excellent example for discussing the Wittgenstein’s quote. We don’t pay atteintion to „simple” possibilities that we have from our bodies. We just think it’s obivious, that we are able to walk, talk and do daily activites. Christina had lost these abilities and then started noticing how important it was. For example, she was thrilled when she could feel wind and light touch on her skin during the car ride. I think that we should appreciate little things like this.

    • #3956
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      The quote provided by Wittgenstein explores the importance of little things that human beings may forget they even have. In Christina’s case, the loss of self-movement and body position was unexpected and shocking. At first, the doctors said that Christina has ‘anxiety hysteria’. But slowly her symptoms got worse and led to complete proprioception, where she had no muscle sense throughout her body. The great thing was that Christina was eager to learn more about her condition and how to adjust her daily life to the changes that she had gone through. Day by day, Christina found ways how to monitor her body by vision and make her movements and reflexed more subtle and automatic. Surely, this whole process was hard on her and required from her a lot of strength, both physically and emotionally.
      The fact that Christina lost her proprioception very suddenly, shows us how fragile one’s life is and how our bodies can transform. It is important to cherish the small things in life that so are familiar to us, that we sometimes forget to notice on a daily basis. Because as shown in the text, those little things can become underappreciated and once they’re gone it may be too late to retrieve them.

    • #3957
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I enjoyed reading the essay. Especially now that I am a psychology student, it made me think about Christina’s experience and how hard it must be to lose such an important sense. I’ve learnt about proprioception and the bad side of taking things for granted. Now I feel more thankful and appreciative of my ‘hidden senses’ – the ones that I can’t physically see, the ones that ‘see’ the world for me. I also found interesting Christina’s way of dealing with her problem and the strange dream that almost predicted the future events.

    • #3958
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I think that this essay is something that everybody should read. That proves that nothing is given to us forever. I was really surprised that ilness like this even exists, and it made me think about this more. Christina’s reaction was understood, because she doesn’t even know, she have something like proprioception before.

    • #3960
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Referring to Wittgenstein’s quote I can tell that Chrtisina’s case is a very good lesson for all of us. We don’t appreciate things in our life which we deem as something certain, obvious. It’s because we have never lost them. Christina lost something such significant like her sense of proprioception, her body become “blind”. She was paralysed, but at the same time she wasn’t. She felt empty, she felt inhuman, like an animal used during lab experiments. It was tragedy for her that she couldn’t fell the world the same way as always. To this day she is going through this nightmare only because she has lost something certain, something obvious which we don’t notice every day. In my opinion this is the most important thing I learnt from this text – we should appreciate every small thing in our life, because we never know when we lose it… and how painful this loss will be.

    • #3965
      admin
      Keymaster

      Everyone, please see a new thread. I’d like you to write more than two or three sentences in response to it. If you started writing in this thread, copy what you’ve written and paste it in the new thread

      • This reply was modified 3 years, 8 months ago by admin.
    • #3987
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I think that we don’t pay attention to things which are obvious. We don’t know how it is when it’s gone. We can’t feel obvious things because we don’t have comparsion.

    • #3998
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I think that we should enjoy our daily. We are very lucky to be healthy and to do most of the activities automatically, without big effort. We have controll over our own body and this is something common for us, but for oder people it can be the biggest dream.

    • #4040
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I felt very sad after reading this text. I really love my body and I just can’t imagine how it is to be disembodied. Wittgenstein said commonly known truth that is forgotten by us in a daily life. I didn’t really knew that without proprioreceptions we are pithed like frogs as it is said in the text. It is because I’m using it unconsciously. Christina’s case is very horrible for me because it shows how important are small and hidden parts of our body. While using my legs I don’t really think how and why they work. Now after reading that Christina could’t at first walk unless paying great attention to it I’m starting to appreciate how my body works and also that I should care for all its parts – the hidden and visable ones. Christina just had bad luck because she didn’t do something that could cause her state – not like the people who took too many vitamins B6. Also just like me she did not get a clue that sometehing uncounsciously used can brake down and change her life forever. Althought she partially acceptted her situation she ,and I quote ” still and forever remains defective and defeated”. It shows that we all should start appreciate what we have even things that are hidden and familiar for us as it is said by the Wittgenstein text.

    • #4044
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I found Christina’s case very interesting. I have never heard about such situation before, because it’s not common. I felt upset for her, because it’s terrible how people’s life can change. I don’t know what would I do if something like that had ever happened to me or someone I know. I think that Ludwig Wittgenstein’s quote: “The aspects of things that are most important for us are hidden because of their simplicity and familiarity” fits perfectly for Christina’s case, because no one would think that such simple things like walking or sitting could be lost. I think that everyone should appreciate their skills, which we use in our daily life.

    • #4098
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Human body is full of surprises. I found one of them, when i readed this essay, because i didn’t know what perception is before. I think that story about Christina is really interesting. She lost something, that she did’t even know that exist, and that changed her life so much.

    • #4151
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I think that yesterday I wrote my comment in the wrong place, so I will rewrite it here.
      I have to admit that I am struck by this story, because it shows how our bodies are complicated and mysterious. It also shows that we take our lives for granted, but the truth is that we don’t know what will come next, we can lose everything at the moment.
      I’m impressed by Christina’s acts and behaviour. I can’t even imagine how difficult must be life without proprioception, but in my opinion she handled it really well. She was fighting bravely for a “normal” life. Although people were looking at her like a freak and she had worse days, she was always bold and gutsy. She is very inspiring.

    • #4165
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      The most important things can be unavailable for to us to see, because we used to ignore things, which are around us everyday. That’s why sometimes we don’t pay attention to our senses. We are just using it them all the time, sometimes automatically. Christina’s case shows that all hidden things can be lost some day and it isn’t given forever. I think she didn’t appreciate it until she lost her proprioreception. She had to consciously think about every move, what which can be exhausting.

      • This reply was modified 3 years, 8 months ago by admin.
    • #4223
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Nowadays we do not pay attention to the most important things. We consider them to be given for to us forever. But when we lose these things, we see how crucial they are. Christina’s case shows us how our body (and our life as well) is fragile and cautions us against taking really major things for granted.
      Ludwig Wittgenstein said “the aspects of things that are most important for us are hidden” but I think that when we stop for a minute, leave earthbound mundane things behind us, finally we will be able to see them.

      • This reply was modified 3 years, 8 months ago by admin.
    • #4240
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      When I thought more about Cristina’s case I actually started to wonder why her dream was so similar to what happened to her after it (losing proprioception). I think it is really strange but interesting at the same time. Maybe it was a coincidance? What do you think about this?

      • This reply was modified 3 years, 8 months ago by admin.
    • #4286
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I think that it was not a coincidance. Maybe our dreams are somehow connected with our current emotions? But in Christina’s case I noticed convergence with “Threat simulation theory” by Antti Revansuo which we were talking about. To be honest, dreaming is really entertaining subject for me. I would like to know clearly why we are dreaming and what they mean.

      • #4295
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I think you are right that our dreams are connected with our emotions. I too think dreams are really interesting Topic because of the mystery behind what they are for. Thanks for really interesting reply 🙂

    • #4298
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      From my point of view organism is a very mysterious and tricky thing for ordinary people. It’s a complex, multifunctional machine. Thinking about everything that is assosiate with our body, all the time, would be overwhelming. In my opinion that’s why we don’t pay attention to little things unless they will manifest their existence.

    • #4684
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      In the context of what Ludwig Wittgenstein said, I think the most important thing is that we don’t notice everything we have until we lose it. Same goes with proprioception, which is absolutely natural for us and unconscious. Becouse of this I can say it was actually ”hidden” becouse it’s not what we usually pay attention to.

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