18th May 2024

“The Disembodied Lady” (Year 1 Wed.)

ENGLISH FOR PSYCHOLOGY Forums Neuropsychology “The Disembodied Lady” (Year 1 Wed.)

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    • #4055
      admin
      Keymaster

      Oliver Sacks, the author of the essay, reflected that Christina “both succeeded and failed”. How do you understand this statement? Do you agree with it? Why, why not?

    • #4063
      admin
      Keymaster

      Hello everyone! Before we start the discussion, I’d like you to take this quiz.

      • #4078
        admin
        Keymaster

        I’d like you to use standard English, including capitalisation and punctuation, and not chatspeak or SMS abbreviation.

    • #4068
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I do not agree with the author of the text. I think that she has not failed at all . In my opinion Christina has such a difficult time living in the “dead body”. She can’t really be herself in her own body. She fells like she has no connection with world that we know. For sure she succeeded in functioning with her condition with was enormously hard.

      • #4070
        admin
        Keymaster

        Hi Susanna, I think we can safely use the past simple when talking about Christina. Do you have any idea why Sacks said that she failed?

    • #4069
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I wouldn’t say that Christina failed. In my opinion it was her body that failed her. She suddenly lost her proprioception and started feeling like a ghost. She is exposed to the unfortunate situations such as social incomprehension and threats – she must stay focused all the time otherwise she may hurt herself. It must be very exhausting. But despite all the difficulties she didn’t give up and remained strong. Christina successfully learned again how to live a life – how to move, eat, talk and do every normal activity like a healthy person. I can only image how hard that was. For me she is a true inspiration.

      • #4072
        admin
        Keymaster

        Hi Dorothy, the same remark: we’d better use the past simple when talking about Christina.
        Why do you think she wasn’t understood?

      • #4177
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        Do you think she really behaved like healthy person, considering everything she did after being diagnosed was a sort of acting? Her activities weren’t actually “normal”, she kind of learnt them.

    • #4071
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Not giving up is never a failure. I guess Sacks might have thought about not recovering completely when saying she “both succeeded and failed”. But still, I can’t agree with him and I must agree with Zuzanna that it is a success for her that she could function in her condition.

      • #4073
        admin
        Keymaster

        I see. What kind of life did she lead?

        • #4378
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          She had to be very strong, because she was very independent. She had two young children, and worked as a computer programmer at home. She was very active.
          But then, she became more and more strong. Because she learnt how to deal with her new situation.

    • #4074
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I find Christina’s case quite interesting and scary at the same time, I believe with the statement “that she both failed and succeeded” to some extent. I don’t believe her loss of priopreception should be seen as a failure, as something she is defeated by as the author stated. It’s something she had no real control over and her moments of weakness (like watching films from the past when she was dancing) were a normal human, emotional reaction. In my eyes she mostly succeeded, she overcame the disability as much as she could, she learned how to live within a society all over again, while all of us, who don’t have such difficulties, had it easier when it came to learning how to function. She made up as much as she could for the loss of sixth sense, and I find that as something that should be seen as a success. I tried imagining myself in her situation and I think a lot of people, including me, wouldn’t be able to overcome the obstacles that she faced. I think it’s underrated how much of mental strength one must have to accept such disability and force themselves to live normally as much as it’s possible.

      What surprised me the most was the fact that she somehow predicted it in her dream, and I wish it was more elaborated and researched in the essay.

      • #4080
        admin
        Keymaster

        Hi Karolina. You wrote that you wouldn’t be able to overcome the obstacles she faced. Do you think you’d have another option? What else could you do except trying to resume your life? Lying in bed, wallowing in self-pity?

        • #4092
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Honestly it’s very hard to imagine what she went through and how would anyone react to it. I think she did have an option either doing something about it and learning how to function or lying in bed, complaining and reminiscing about the past. I think for me personally it would take time to adjust and even accept the loss of the sense, but at the same time I can only imagine. There is a chance I would act differently than I expect now, if the situation occurred. A lot of elderly people tend to get mad at the world and aggressive when they are starting to feel like their health is deteriorating and I think that is in a way a coping mechanism that also could happen in this particular disability of losing priopreception. I don’t know how I would personally overcome the frustration of not being aware of my own body and feeling, as she phrased it, pithed.

          • #4101
            admin
            Keymaster

            “I think she did have an option either doing something about it and learning how to function or lying in bed, complaining and reminiscing about the past. I think for me personally it would take time to adjust and even accept the loss of the sense …” – yes, she had and she eventually chose life. It did take her some time – do you remember how long she was in hospital? People are incredibly resilient and able to adopt to new conditions. I may not happen overnight, though.

            • #4109
              Anonymous
              Inactive

              If I remember correctly she stayed in the rehabilitation ward for about a year.

              • #4112
                admin
                Keymaster

                Indeed, so she had a lot of time to come to terms with her disability.
                What surprised/interested you the most while reading the essay?

                • #4138
                  Anonymous
                  Inactive

                  Everything was interesting but what stayed with me is what I stated earlier, the fact that she had a dream about it before it happened and I wish it was more researched in the essay. Was it her instinct or her body giving her signals, information? I think it’s the most interesting yet underrated part.

                  • #4143
                    admin
                    Keymaster

                    There is a nice attempt at explaining the dream Chrisitna had. Have a look at this post #4120

    • #4075
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I belleve that he had on mind only her body because it failed her. It wasn’t her fault that she had such condition.

      • #4085
        admin
        Keymaster

        Or maybe the thought that she failed in being? She was not the person she used to be as her life changed dramatically.

        • #4096
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          I agree with Zuzanna, I think the author meant that her body failed her, not that she has failed as herself. She could still feel emotions, she was still aware and able to communicate and think and be her own person, she just couldn’t really express it in a way society is used to. Just because she changed doesn’t mean she failed, it just means she adjusted to the new circumstances.

          • #4102
            admin
            Keymaster

            I see. However, at times, she considered herself defective and defeated. Don’t you think it’s hardly an attitude of a successful person?

            • #4106
              Anonymous
              Inactive

              Not really, because moments of doubts or feeling defeated don’t erase the success and the work she has done. I feel like her success is not about the attitude, but more of what she overcame and managed to live with.

              • #4117
                admin
                Keymaster

                Yes, you’re right. Do you know another person who is struggling/struggled with a loss in their life, in the medical sense (e.g. a loss of memory, speech or sight)?

                • #4140
                  Anonymous
                  Inactive

                  I unfortunately don’t know anyone who has had a long term loss, but I do know someone who had a short term memory loss, who was my grandpa who had a bad reaction to the meds he was given and suffered from memory loss. He didn’t recognize anyone, even my mom (his daughter) or his wife, but thankfully with time he remembered everything and is all fine now. I don’t remember all the details because I was about 8 or 9 nine years old but from my point of view it didn’t last very long, maybe 1 or 2 months.

                  • This reply was modified 4 years, 2 months ago by admin.
                  • #4146
                    admin
                    Keymaster

                    Your granpa was lucky to lose his memory only for a brief period of time. Lots of people, in particular those with dementia, never regain memory.

        • #4107
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          She was still a person. She didn’t stop feeling emotions, vulnerability etc. Only she was seriously sick and that was her biggest weaknes and biggest problem. Body is only a body. We associate ourself with it but it didn’t make us who we are. Our human side make us who we are. She was still the same only with demaged body

          • #4134
            admin
            Keymaster

            I wouldn’t call her sick or ill, Susanna. She was disabled just as disabled is a person with e.g. vision loss.
            Do you know a peron who is struggling or struggled with a loss in the medical context? It could be someone who know or just heard of.

            • #4152
              Anonymous
              Inactive

              Some time ago I find on youtube a girl that lost her audition when she was adult. She is Jessica Kellegren-Fozard. Amazing thing about her case is that she still can talk and has no problem with communicating with not disabled one non-disabled people because she developed lipreading ability/skills.
              I am sure that firstly it was hard for her but now she is a role model for everyone with some struggle in live life (not only medical) that you can defeat it and live happily.

              • This reply was modified 4 years, 2 months ago by admin.
              • #4169
                admin
                Keymaster

                Thank you for bringing this case to my attention. I will watch the video.

                • #4178
                  Anonymous
                  Inactive

                  Don’t you think Christina’s case was quite different? She wasn’t disabled in the way that people are used to – no wheelchair, no sign of problems with for example hearing. Do you think it matters in this case?

    • #4076
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I do not agree that she failed. Christina’s case shows how much we depend on things that we don’t even realize exist as long as they work properly. Healthy people do daily things easily without thinking, they can make few activities at the same time and don’t even realize how lucky they are and how hard would it be if their’s system wasn’t working right. She learnt how to live despite all the issues and in my opinion she did great, she never gave up so she should be an example for other people.

      • #4081
        admin
        Keymaster

        Hi Victoria. Can you shed some light on the kind of life she had after she lost her proprioception? And what is proprioception in the first place?

        • #4089
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          It’s one of our hidden sense, it makes that we feel our bodies, we know that they belong to us.
          Her life wasn’t the best for sure because she didn’t have support from the society, what is more she was the first of this kind, so she didn’t understand exactly what was happening to her and she couldn’t defend herself from other people because no-one ever heard about such a disease. She lost part of herself as she said she didn’t remembered her life before and she was a completely different woman. There is said that she failed at being but did she? She learnt how to function and I’m sure that it cost her a lot of energy, commitment and courage. I think she chose better option of living than giving up and waiting for death.

          • #4090
            admin
            Keymaster

            I see. Do you think that choosing life over death is courageous?
            Sacks said that she filed at being. Maybe her life was so uncomplete that she considered herself defective?

            • #4103
              Anonymous
              Inactive

              Probably she did. Especially seeing all those happy, healthy people she must had been thinking why it happened to her but still if so, then why she kept going?
              Yes, I do think that choosing life over death is courageous, because sometimes it is more difficult to do and choosing more difficult and tough option needs courage.

              • #4114
                admin
                Keymaster

                Or maybe she tried to move on because it was the only thing to do? After all, she had children to provide for, and I’m quite certain that she was a single mother.
                Anyway, she resumed her life and in that she was successful.
                What surprised/interested you the most while reading the essay?

                • #4124
                  Anonymous
                  Inactive

                  In fact the whole essay was quite interesting for me because I have never heard before about proprioception, it is fascinating that she could learn again how to control her body “only” by looking at it. It wasn’t normal moves but she could make them perfect at some point. It fascinates and scares me a lot because I can’t imagine it. The essay also shows that we can never be sure of anything because unexpected things can happen and turn our world upside down. I’m quite curious what happened to her children, how they functioned in this situation so I wish their point of view was included somehow.

                  • #4135
                    admin
                    Keymaster

                    Yes, the story told from the perspective of her children could be very interesting.
                    Do you know someone who is facing or faced a dramatic loss in the medical context?

                    • #4142
                      Anonymous
                      Inactive

                      Yes I know a few, but the loss is caused by age or they had a car accident.

                      • #4147
                        admin
                        Keymaster

                        Every loss, especially when unexpected, is devastating.

                      • #4153
                        Anonymous
                        Inactive

                        That’s true. Fortunately people I know learnt to live with all those painful memories and disabilities and they are ones of the most amazing, optimistic an inspiring people I have ever met.

                      • #4157
                        admin
                        Keymaster

                        Often after brushing with death, people become more appreciative of life, in every form. In one of the posts I said that people are incredibly resilient and adapt relatively quickly to a new life.

    • #4077
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Yes, I do agree. She succeeded because she managed to learn how to live while being unable to feel her body. After some time she could move and do all the casual staff involving moving by concentrating her sight on each action she would want her body to do. Yet she failed because life afterwards was hard when she couldn’t see her old self in herself, couldn’t feel she have a body unless some light touches like wind against her skin would occur. Also people had no mercy as they couldn’t see her disability and would curse on her. It was possible to live in her condition but not normal. I think it really damaged her mental health and she felt broken.

      • #4082
        admin
        Keymaster

        Daria, why do you think some people were hostile to Christina?

        • #4087
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Her disability wasn’t clear. They probably thought she was messing around or that she was drunk. For strangers she looked ‘normal’ and acted weird so they were annoyed by her behavior. In result they treated her unkindly.

          • #4091
            admin
            Keymaster

            Is it easy for you to relate to Christina?

            • #4113
              Anonymous
              Inactive

              No, because I can’t imagine myself in her situation. I don’t know how it’s like to move but controlling it with my sight, feeling only light touches and not feeling my body at all. Nothing similar has ever happened to me so I don’t think I can relate to Christina in any way but I do respect her a lot.

              • #4118
                admin
                Keymaster

                I see. It’s indeed difficult to relate to her. Is her condition/disability rare? Are there many people with the loss of proprioception?

                • #4133
                  Anonymous
                  Inactive

                  According to the text there’s hundreds of people with the loss of proprioception but I think it’s rare especially those ones like Christina who can’t be cured.

                  • #4179
                    Anonymous
                    Inactive

                    Assuming that she knew she was the only one who can’t be cured, do you think it mattered? Awareness of being the only person in such situation?

                    • #4195
                      Anonymous
                      Inactive

                      For sure it does. It always feels better when you’re not alone and someone can give you some advice or just simply understand you.

                      • This reply was modified 4 years, 2 months ago by admin.
                      • This reply was modified 4 years, 2 months ago by admin.
    • #4079
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      She lost proprioception which is responsible for let’s say feeling the body. She didn’t feel her hands or feet. For instance her face became expressionless. Her life changed from functioning normally to hardly functioning. Everyday activities started to be hard for her.

      • #4083
        admin
        Keymaster

        But if she didn’t feel her body and had no control over it, how was it possible for her to function relatively independently in society – have a job, take care of her children, move around?

        • #4086
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          She had to learn using her ears and vision as her main organs and focus on not diverting her attention. This way she slowly learnt how to walk or take public transport. Due to rehabilitation physical therapy it was possible for her to act relatively as before she had lost her proprioception. It wasn’t easy not even because of her inability to do everything like a healthy person but also because of the lack of social support and sympathy – for example while taking public transport. But the main reason for her return to normal life was the varied therapy and rehabilitation.

          • This reply was modified 4 years, 2 months ago by admin.
          • #4095
            admin
            Keymaster

            Indeed. Christina once called herself “pithed”. Do you remember what she meant by it?

            • #4111
              Anonymous
              Inactive

              Pithed, like a frog. She meant that she didn’t have sense of herself. She couldn’t identify with her old version and what’s more she couldn’t remember or imagine herself before this state. It’s like she lost her identify.

              • #4115
                admin
                Keymaster

                Yes, pithed like a frog. But was exactly does it mean?

                • #4126
                  Anonymous
                  Inactive

                  She felt as if she was taken the spinal cord away or had it broken. That’s how I understand it.

                  • #4148
                    admin
                    Keymaster

                    Yes, she felt as if her spinal cord was removed or severed. An interesting choice of words, by the way.

    • #4084
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Like most girls, I think that it’s hard to talk about failure in this case. Author of this essay by saying “she failed” probably ment that Christina had lost her chance to live like she used to and she had became disabled for the rest of her life. I can’t imagine how hard must be loosing proprioception. For me Christina definitely succeded and she was undeniably a real hero. She was so powerful, because she didn’t give up, she just learned how to live without her hidden sense. Christina is an inspiration.

      • #4088
        admin
        Keymaster

        Hi Emily. You wrote that she was a hero because she never gave up. Was there anything else except not giving up? You can’t stay forever in bed, cry and wallow in self-pity. How about the moments of despair? Did she admit to herself that she was defective and defeated?

        • #4099
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          She could give up and just broke. In the book “Me before you” main character is disabled and he is not even trying to live like normal person, he desires to die because he can’t handle his “new” disabled body. Christina could do the same. She wouldn’t be a human if she didn’t have moments of despair, it’s normal, but after that she tried to live like everyone else, and nothing else matters.

          • #4105
            admin
            Keymaster

            I haven’t read this book. But it’s a good think you mentioned another character facing a loss in his life. Of course, Christina could have broken down, but she had children and she had to live for them.
            Is it easy for you to relate to her?

            • #4156
              Anonymous
              Inactive

              It is definitely not easy to relate to her, for me honestly it’s almost impossible. I can’t imagine myself in such situation, I have no idea what would I do if I was her. I think her children must have been big motivation for her, but I know that in some cases people after some traumatic events or accidents are so broken that they do not care about their families. Christina must had have strong will to fight and big love for her family and for life to handle everything what happened to her.

              P.S. I highly recommend the book I mentioned. It is nice to read, but also very touching.

              • #4181
                Anonymous
                Inactive

                Do you think that rareness of her disability is a thing that makes relating to Christina so hard?

                • #4186
                  Anonymous
                  Inactive

                  Of course, Joanna! It is almost impossible for me to imagine what she must have feel. I tried to compare her disability to feelings I know, but nothing I know is not even similiar to her situation. I think that other people feel the same. What about you, Joanna? Can you imagine how hard must be living with her disability?

                  • #4194
                    Anonymous
                    Inactive

                    I think I can’t even imagine that. I think it would be easier for her to live normally if people understood her disability – they didn’t, but I can’t blame them. It is a really uncommon situation, seeing person who’s not even sure where their hands are. But the worst thing for me is that they not only didn’t understand her – they didn’t even try and were quite rude for her. I think this is the worst. She doesn’t feel like her body was hers, and doesn’t feel like part of society anymore. It must be awful, don’t you think?

                    • #4197
                      Anonymous
                      Inactive

                      I totally agree. But we must consider that random people on the street had no idea about her disability, so as you said we can’t blame them. I can’t imagine how did Christina look like when she tried to move, but that may looked like she was drunk or high and as we know, people are not used to help people in that state of mind, so I can somehow understand their reaction and missunderstanding.

    • #4093
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Well, Christina said that she experienced unpleasant comments about her disability from people that weren’t aware what happend to her. She tried to overcome the obstacles but sometimes others made it difficult for her.

      • #4097
        admin
        Keymaster

        I see. Were people aware of her disability? If so, why were they so unkind?

        • #4367
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          They were not. It’s easy to judge. People are unkind because they think, that everyone is as healthy as them.

    • #4100
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Despite understanding why the author of the text could see Christina’s case as both success and failer, I don’t agree with his opinion. The situation she found herself in, sounds extremly challenging and I can’t imagine how difficult it must have been for her. Her condition was not something a lot of people came across at that times and I imagine that not a lot of them would even know what to do in her place. The fact that she learned how to oparate her body using her vision and how to live her live, despite all the challenges she was facing on a daily basis, is truly incredible. It’s true that she never “got her body back” but I wouldn’t call the way she learned how to functionate with her condition a defeat.

      • #4108
        admin
        Keymaster

        I see. What surprised or interested you the most in this essay?

        • This reply was modified 4 years, 2 months ago by admin.
        • #4120
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Chritina’s condition in itself was pretty interesting to me. I can’t imagine how it must have felt for her to see her body but not feel that it’s actually hers. Making movements using only your vision also sounds as incredible as it sounds scary. The thing that caught me by suprise was also the dream she had before her conditioned started. I wonder if it was her brain’s unconscious response to what was already happening in her body or was it truly a prophetic dream.

          • #4129
            admin
            Keymaster

            I also thought about this dream because I don’t believe that dreams offer us an insight into our lives. But you right, the process of losing proprioception could have started before she displayed any signs or symptoms. At the time she could already have had the inflammation.

            • #4155
              Anonymous
              Inactive

              Another thing that caught my attention was the way people mentioned in the article reacted to Christina’s condition. Even at the beggining of the text, after telling the doctor about her weird symptomes, Christina wasn’t taken seriously until she couldn’t feel or control her body anymore. Later it was also mentioned how people on a public transport would look down on her, not understanding that the way she moved wasn’t something she could control. It was mentioned that even if she wanted to explain her condition, she wouldn’t know how to do so, since the nature of it was very diffrent from what we normally see.

              • #4159
                admin
                Keymaster

                People can be cruel if they don’t understand or know something. I’m not surprised that they knew nothing about proprioception, though – just go outside and ask a random person what proprioception is. She may have a hard time even repeating this word (of course, you shouldn’t go out, given out current situation) 🙂

      • #4172
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        No, I don’t think they were aware of her disability. But still they were unkind, maybe because of the fact that people are sometimes hostile to things that they don’t understand?

        • #4180
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          It might be the case. It was even mentioned that for example blind people at least are treated with solicitude beacuse it is easier to imagine the situation their in. It is possible for person without any condition to close their eyes to partly understand what a blind person is experiencing but it isn’t possible to just disconnect from body. It’s even impossible to imagine that state.

          • #4199
            admin
            Keymaster

            Right, and we don’t want to find out what this disability is like. Sometimes, though, proprioception can be misleading, as in the case when you deduce that a box is heavy (just by the look of it) and you lift it as if it were indeed heavy, but it turns out to be ligh – it feels strange, doesn’t it? You may even lose your balance.
            Another thing is, lots of people may temporarily experience the loss of proprioception when they take too much of vitamin 6.

    • #4104
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I don’t agree with the author of the text that Christina both succeeded and failed. Despite her body remaining unreal, Christina was trying her best to lead quite a normal life as if she was a healthy person. It was an unexpected challenge which required a great deal of strength and persistence.
      Christina may have lost proprioception but she remained an independent and courageous human being and this is inspiring.

      • #4110
        admin
        Keymaster

        Do you know another person who is facing/faced a dramatic loss (in the medical sense) in his life? It could be someone you know or just heard of.

        • This reply was modified 4 years, 2 months ago by admin.
        • #4119
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          I have a friend who was partially paralyzed from a waist down in a car accident. This situation is precarious and extremely challenging for her. She’s going through physical therapy and hoping for the best.

          • This reply was modified 4 years, 2 months ago by admin.
          • This reply was modified 4 years, 2 months ago by admin.
          • #4121
            admin
            Keymaster

            Does she have a chance of full recovery? How is she dealing with her disability?

            • #4128
              Anonymous
              Inactive

              While the doctors give her only a slight chance of full recovery, she doesn’t loose lose faith and is certain she will get better soon. She’s never been more optimistic and appreciative of life. Despite her disability she is doing things she has always dreamed of, such as traveling.

              • This reply was modified 4 years, 2 months ago by admin.
              • #4137
                admin
                Keymaster

                I understand that is a wheelchair user. How does she travel?

                • #4158
                  Anonymous
                  Inactive

                  She has a devoted friend who accompanies her during all of her journeys. They travel by car with the wheelchair in the trunk of their car.

                  • #4214
                    admin
                    Keymaster

                    Well, good for her that she has such a friend. I do hope she will get better over time. But the most important thing is that she doen’t lose hope and tries to live as she did before.

    • #4125
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I think the author said that she has failed,because her body “wasn’t hers” anymore. But, considering the fact that she tried her best and did actually everything she could – I wouldn’t say she failed at all. She found herself in horrible situation she couldn’t understand – I mean, she used to have normal life which she probably enjoyed, was a mother and working woman – and suddenly she can’t couldn’t even feel her body. I’m sure it was horrible for her. But she was strong enough to stay in hospital for a year(!) and try to find a way to be herself again. Christina didn’t fail, her body did. For me, she is kind of winner here – and she succeeded.

      • This reply was modified 4 years, 2 months ago by admin.
      • #4139
        admin
        Keymaster

        Hi, Joanna. Proprioception The sense of body is said to come from three systems. Do you know what these systems are?

        • This reply was modified 4 years, 2 months ago by admin.
        • This reply was modified 4 years, 2 months ago by admin.
        • #4164
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          I’m not sure. I know that sense of body is given by vision, balance organs and proprioception, which is the control, the owning and operation of our body, but I don’t know if this is what you’re asking for.

          • #4170
            admin
            Keymaster

            It is the answer I expected although I made a mistake in my question.
            By the way, proprioception comes from nerve endings located in muscles, joints and tendons.

            Take over from me now 🙂

    • #4127
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Well, for me she did not fail at all. Her body failed, but that was not her fault. She moved on and tried to live with it. Of course, she felt a sense of loss and had several moments of breakdown, but who wouldn’t have? That was a hard situation for her, but she didn’t give up, and learned to live normally. I would say that at the end she succeeded.

      • This reply was modified 4 years, 2 months ago by admin.
      • This reply was modified 4 years, 2 months ago by admin.
      • #4141
        admin
        Keymaster

        Hi, Nataly. Do you remember the reason why she lost her proprioception?

    • #4144
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I think that Christina definitely did not fail. After all, she managed to some extent go back to her life prior to losing her proprioception. Despite having some issues along the way to full recovery, such as a lack of sympathy from society, Christina fought those battles in order to regain her strength, both mental and physical. In the end, she came back home and started working again, which I think is remarkable. I strongly admire her attitude and how she handled this whole situation.

      • #4150
        admin
        Keymaster

        Hi Gabriella, it’s nice to see you today as well 🙂

    • #4149
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      In my opinion the author is right. Christina win won, because she learnt how to live with such an inconvenience and after that she can could live like she lived before in some way. But she also failed, because this situation in the beggining lead her to being dependent on help from other people.

      • This reply was modified 4 years, 2 months ago by admin.
      • #4162
        admin
        Keymaster

        Is it easy for you to relate to Christina?

        • #4377
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          For me it is very hard to relate to Christina, because I think I wouldn’t be able to get up after such an unexpected experience. In my opinion she is very strong women, because not everybody could manage to live normally after losing prioprocetion. For me it wouldn’t be easy and I can’t imagine how bad she felt.

    • #4166
      admin
      Keymaster

      Dear Moderators, try to moderate the discussion when I am not here. Everyone, talk more among yourself. You can stray from the main thread, of course. Moderators, if you see fit, open a new thread – you’re entitled to do it.
      I will be back 🙂

    • #4167
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I think that because it wasn’t Christina’s choice to have this condition, we shouldn’t say that she has failed. Not only she is was she the first case of losing proprioception, but also there wasn’t much knowledge about how to help her. She has spent years trying to learn how to funcion again. She didn’t give up. The lack of support from society and not having someone she could relate to could have damaged her mental state even more. Every little progress she has made after losing her proprioception I see as a success.

      • This reply was modified 4 years, 2 months ago by admin.
      • #4174
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I agree with you. I think it was really hard not to know what happend to you. She couldn’t get more informations about her illness disability/condition. She was all alone. There wastn’t any other person with the same disease that she could talk to. Nobody knew the exact reason of her case. If I were her I would be very scared. I admire her because she didn’t lose hope and didn’t give up and what is more she found the energy to learn all the things again. This is a real success.

        • This reply was modified 4 years, 2 months ago by admin.
        • #4184
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          In a situation like this a person could really benefit from meeting someone with a similar condition. It could make things a lot easier to process and give a different perspective. Socializing with others is essencial for people. And is a lot easier when we don’t feel excluded or different from others. Christina wasn’t able to experience that.

      • #4182
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        Girls, do you think that if there were more people with this kind of disability, it would make Christina feel any better?

        • #4185
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Yes, I do. I can’t even imagine how alone she felt knowing that no one had similar experience. It would definitely help her with understanding her condition at the beginning and during the whole recovery process.

        • #4187
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          It is very probable. There would be more advice how to deal with that disability and maybe some support groups that could help her.

        • #4189
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          She would feel more secure, not like an outsider. It’s good to talk to someone who understands you, especially when even you don’t know what is happening to your body and how to deal with it.

        • #4191
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          I agree with everyone above, but also I think that if more cases like hers were known then the people would be more understanding. Raising awareness to less known disabilities creates a more educated society.

          As the essay stated, Christina’s story was mostly settled in late 70’s and 80’s. Do you guys think that in today’s world people would perceive her condition differently and be less judgemental than back then?

          • #4219
            Anonymous
            Inactive

            And when it comes to judging – nowadays everything and everyone can be easily judged by everyone. So, it is possible that she would meet with incomprehension. That’s very common among people to perceive some things differently and still judge without knowing what’s hidden behind some behaviour etc.

          • #4221
            Anonymous
            Inactive

            Today’s society is definitely more sensitive and open to those kind of aspects. I think that more and more people are becoming aware of the fact that sometimes it’s better not to react or comment on something if they lack knowledge. I even see a difference between younger and older members of my family. But of course it doesn’t apply to everyone.

        • #4218
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Maybe then she wouldn’t have had the feeling of being different. For sure, it would be easier for her psyche – the feeling that there are more people like her and with problems like hers.

        • #4442
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          Yes, definitely. In my opinion she would feel better with people around her who really know how she feels. They could also be best friends because of the same problems. It’s crucial that we make connections with people whose life is similar to ours. It’s obvious that life with this condition is hard so having friends that have the same problem means we can talk about our worries, share tips how to make our daily life easier.

          • This reply was modified 4 years, 1 month ago by admin.
    • #4183
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      In my opinion Christina won. The condition of her body was independent of her will. Doctors did everything they could, but full physical recovery wasn’t avaliable at the time due to lack of knowledge about this phenomen. It’s not really a defeat, if you don’t know what exactly are you fighting. Also in her case I wouldn’t use words like “fail”. I think it’s more like her body just started to work different. And she didn’t broke down, she managed to live normal, even if kind of “unnatural”, life, as she consciously learnt how to do everyday activities.

      • #4188
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        Can you imagine how you would react to similar situation? I know that is very hard to imagine, but would you be able to predict your reaction and mindset?

    • #4190
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      The author said that Christina failed, because she couldn’t live as well as other people, no matter how much she tried. I disagree. I find her successful person because of her struggling. Her effort led to better life, as good as she could live. Her position wasn’t her fault, so the isn’t any reason to say that she failed. Moreover, she didn’t blame anyone, both herself or another person for her disability. She started to face her problems, to compensate her lacks with the vision, but it was really hard. She had to be careful all the time, but it led to her adaptation in the end, as good as it was possible. She was a real fighter, she didn’t give up, despite her rare and extremely tough syndrome.

      • #4192
        Anonymous
        Inactive

        I think that she dealt with the condition very well, as well. Although even imagining myself in her position is scary and frustrating. What are your thoughts on how you would be able to adjust to such difficult condition like she did, learning everything all over again with many more obstacles to face?

        • #4196
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          I totally agree with you that even thoughts about disability like that are really frightening. It’s hard for me to tell you if I could be that strong as Christine was. I think I would need a lot of support from other people, not only physical, but most of all mental. It would be really hard to cope with thought that you would never be able-bodied, like other people and yourself before.

    • #4200
      admin
      Keymaster

      If you’d like to watch a short video about a lack of proprioception here it is.

    • #4205
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I think that by saying Christina failed the author meant the fact that she didn’t recover from her affliction, she ’failed in being’, had to change her life etc. Maybe it’s just the words he used, but I can’t agree with him – in my opinion she succeeded in every aspect of the situation she was put in. She didn’t give up, she did everything that was possible to live a life that was at least close to normal. It cost her a lot of hard work and suffering, but she chose that over letting her disability take over her life completely.
      I think that in situations like this – when something fails them, their body, the world – people always have two options: to give up or to fight. And, although I don’t think it’s my place to judge anyone in a situation as difficult as Christina’s, I can surely call everyone who chooses the second option a hero and a person who succeeded in life.

    • #4210
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I totally agree with you. She showed her mettle and we could say she was mentally strong. People who do not give up despite the obstacles but even try to overcome them always inspire me.

    • #4211
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I strongly disagree with Olivier Oliver Sacks – the author. Saying that she “failed” is so inequitable and harmful. People like Christina might feel miserable if they hear something like that. It also may have an impact on theirs health and level of motivation to fight with disabilities. Both Christina and the man from the linked video are trying their best to make their life better and to live like an average person. We should respect them and do everything to make their life better e.g. socialize with them. Saying that “they failed” definitely won’t help, it only can worsen the situation.

      • This reply was modified 4 years, 2 months ago by admin.
      • #4216
        admin
        Keymaster

        Hi Patricia, it’s a good think that you watched the video. You’re right – not everything is up to us. The quality of our life depends also on other people and they/we shouldn’t descriminate against anyone.

    • #4222
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Following the opinions of others I do not agree with the statement that she failed. The author meant that she failed, because she couldn’t live as well and comfortably as other people. But still, I disagree with him. She lost proprioception, she didn’t feel her body and had no control over it. She didn’t give up, despite the lack of public support. I can’t imagine being in a situation like Christina and I think she succeded.

      • #4271
        admin
        Keymaster

        What if the woman had been blind? She would have had no chance of coming back to life. The sense of hearing alone wouldn’t have helped her much.

        • #4279
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          There would be almost no chance of dealing with this situation. However, Christina had her eyesight and could focus only on this one disease and overcome it.

    • #4374
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      But when someone loses for example sense of hearing- his sense of sight becomes more sensitive. And maybe it doesn’t help much, but it is still helpfull. It’s hard to think about situation, in which there’s no solution or person has lost cause.

    • #4380
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I think it’s hard for us to imagine how we will react in such situation, because we didn’t “collide” in our lifes with losing prioproception.

    • #4456
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I understand Sacks’s statement as referring to Christina’s case, not personally to her. Her case was quite failed because medicine was helpless and no one could help her. Christina has never been cured. However, her functioning and approach to this “new life” could be definitely considered as a success.

    • #4494
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      There is no doubt that Christinas case is horrible. But the author of the text judged her situation by saying that she both succeeded and failed. I can say that I only partially agree with his statement. Getting to know a little about her illness, I can only imagine how much the girl must have been devastated. Losing proprioreceptors leads to losing control over your body. It was a huge achievement for her to learn some basic body movements and taking even partial control over her body back. In this aspect Christina won, because she could start living a decently normal life again and be almost independent. She is a hero to me, because I can only imagine how difficult it must have been to learn everything from the start. I completely agree with Oliver Sacks on that. But I can’t agree with the statement that she failed. She did her best to get back to normal. The fact that her illness unabled her to get completely well wasn’t her fault. Although I do imagine that the author wanted to say that, she just isn’t able to get back to normal (and probably that’s why he used the word “failed”). But to me she hasn’t failed at all.

      • #4521
        admin
        Keymaster

        Christina was young at the time she lost proprioception. Do you think her life would have been different if she had lost it as a middle-aged woman?

        • #4639
          Anonymous
          Inactive

          I think that it would. Because of the age her body was strong enough to deal with the condition and without it she wouldn’t get back to her daily life again. If she lost her proprioreceptors as a middle-aged woman her body wouldn’t handle this disease. Whats more in my opinion she could be dependent on other people who would have to help her with everyday activities that would be too hard for her. Also she could be very frustrated about how long it would take her to get healthy again and with this her motivation would be weaker.

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